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Old 02-11-2012, 07:22 AM   #26
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Hey Chris, Empty weight 1040 57 on the tail wheel. This means minimum rear seat load of 165 to keep it within forward cg.Video's will come when I manage to convert and upload them.So far I have just had the 20min flight it felt like a very nice plane to fly very responsive to the touch. Next flight airspeed Calibration then into the stalling and oscillation damping checks



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Old 02-28-2012, 12:08 AM   #27
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Hey Dave how's the flight testing going? Do you have the 40 hour requirement over there? Let me know as soon as you can take up a pax. Our one customer over there (the one that flew us to see you in the helo) wants me to do a 100 hr on his plane in the late summer/fall and I'd love to go up with ya!



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Old 03-27-2012, 06:58 AM   #28
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Hi Chris, Missed your post sorry I did not reply. We have a minimum of 5 hrs test though this is likely to take about 8hrs to get the permit issued. Then there is a separate permit for the aero's which will take another 25hrs At the moment I have done 2hrs 20 min a large amount of it is airspeed calibration. I find it much easier to read the forward cockpit airspeed than the rear cockpit when on final approach. However the catch being I have found out it under reads. So have been flying the approach a little to fast and been wondering why I floated.The engine prop combination works well. at cruise speed lower the nose 10degree advance throttle to fully forward when I hit 140mph engine is giving 2700 rpm. 140 being the recommended entry speed into aero's.So all in all should have it all sorted by the time you come over here.

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Old 03-27-2012, 11:18 AM   #29
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Wouldn't you want 100% RPM at a lower speed for akro work? As it is now, when you're doing a half loop+half roll the engine will not be much help at the top when you're rolling. Same for a reverse Cuban, the half roll on the upline will be done at much less than rated HP for the engine and the airplane will be slowing quickly. The other low speed consideration is when you're with a passenger -- I'd like to have something at least close to full HP during climb. There are a lot of ways to look it this, I'm curious as to your goals for the airplane and how those fit with your current setup.

I also have a question about the 25 hours for approval to do aerobatics. What do you need to do for those 25 hours to qualify?


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Old 03-27-2012, 01:40 PM   #30
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Yes I can see what you are saying, sadly there is much less room in the UK for innovation . This is what the LAA the equivalent of the EAA want. And it is what I have to show them in order to get the permit to fly. The Aircraft has to have flown for 25hrs before you are given a permit to test for aerobatics'.In level flight full throttle the engine will produce 2700rpm the LAA have a big thing about exceeding the engine limitations

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Old 03-27-2012, 01:59 PM   #31
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Too bad they're so strict. All they want here is instruments marked to the proper redlines, they don't get involved with prop choices, etc. I think the FAA would like to see folks not do akro until after they fly off their restrictions but we usually ignore that. We are, after all, testing aerobatic airplanes -- no use waiting 25-40 hrs to see if the systems work in all attitudes.....

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Old 03-27-2012, 05:37 PM   #32
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I finished my AcroSport I a couple of years back and if I remember right, as part of the 40 hours that I had to fly for my experimental Lycoming, I had to demostrate that the airplane flew all the aerobatic maneuvers that I claimed it can fly. the operating limitations stated that. So we do have a requirement in the US, from the FAA to demostrate that the airplane can fly aerobatics. You may want to read your Operating Limitations.

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Old 03-27-2012, 06:11 PM   #33
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Perhaps it depends on how the limitations are written or how the inspectorinterprets the rules.
My experience comes from running into the FAA inspector that issued the airworthiness certificate a couple of weeks after the first flight. He asked how it was going and I told him what I had done so far -- and got a lecture on not doing akro until the limitations were met. This was a long time ago (1979). After that I just learned not to mention any details to the feds. I probably should have questioned the limitations at the time but I was just happy to get the inspection behind me and get flying. Looking back, I'm not sure I even read the document.[img]smileys/smiley1.gif[/img]

Another question comes to mind, much later;

This only applies to homebuilts, correct? They wouldn't expect you to change the prop on a certified S-1S, would they? It gets 2700rpm at climb speed (100mph) with the standard prop.

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Old 03-28-2012, 03:30 PM   #34
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Most Operating Limitations come with some sort of standard fraseology. Most of them will say something like"This aircraft may not be flown after incorporating a major change as defined by 14 CFR part 21.93". A change of a propeller is a major change whether standard or experimental category. In the case of an Experimental, it will need an inspection from the FAA or a DAR and some type of test flight of let's say 5 hours.
I will be very surprised if an FAA Examiner issues Operating Limitations to an Aerobatic Aircraft and then tells you not to fly aerobatics!
The typical statement is something like this:"This aircraft may conduct aerobatic flight in accordance with the provisions of § 91.303. Aerobatics must not be attempted until sufficient flight experience has been gained to establish that the aircraft is satisfactorily controllable and in compliance with § 91.319(b). The aircraft may only conduct those aerobatic flight maneuvers that have been satisfactorily accomplished during flight testing and recorded in the aircraft logbook andmaintenance records by use of the following, or a similarly worded, statement:“I certify that the following aerobatic maneuvers have been test flown and that the aircraft is controllable throughout the maneuvers’ normal range of speeds, and is safe for operation. The flight-tested aerobatic maneuvers are _________, _________, __________, and __________.”
Therefore you must demonstrate and fly the aerobatic maneuvers during the phase 1 (40 or 25 hours) of your test flight.
Again, you may want to look at the Operating Limitation to see if aerobatics are approved.



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