ADS-B tests on the ground after installation

Discussion in 'Electrical & Instrumentation' started by Charles67, May 22, 2018.

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  1. May 22, 2018 #1

    Charles67

    Charles67

    Charles67

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    What tests have to be performed by the avionics shop on the ground to verify that the ADS-B equipment has been installed properly and is working as required by the FAA?

    Also:
    - What equipment is required to perform the tests?
    - Has this equipment to be purchased by the avionics shop specifically to do ADS-B work or it is equipment that most shops usually already own for testing other avionics?

    Thanks
     
  2. May 22, 2018 #2

    Cameron

    Cameron

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  3. May 22, 2018 #3

    TFF1

    TFF1

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    The shop, the company I work for used, has a web based connection to the FAA. You don't get the altitude or GPS locations sitting on the ground. One of my company pilots took the aircraft away, and I watched ,with the avionics shop guy on his I pad, the info as my guy flew away.
     
  4. May 23, 2018 #4

    Charles67

    Charles67

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    Thanks for your replies.

    I am trying to avoid to be in a situation in which I go flying after the ADS-B equipment is installed and the performance of the equipment is not acceptable to ATC and it becomes necessary to open up the airplane again to get access to the various ADS-B components. And perhaps it is necessary to go through this a few times before everything is sorted out.

    I have talked to a couple of shops and they don't seem to have any ADS-B testing equipment, but I am not sure if this equipment is available and other shops have it or it just does not exist.
     
  5. May 23, 2018 #5

    IanJ

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    It shouldn't be hard to determine basic functionality: find another pilot who's got an ADS-B In system (Stratus, Stratux, any of the glass-panel systems), and see if your plane shows up on his screen. I think (but am not sure) that the Out system should transmit position pings even if it's sitting still on the ground. That would at least confirm that you're transmitting basic data correctly.
     
  6. May 23, 2018 #6

    TFF1

    TFF1

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    Until 2020 it is optional equipment. Working is relative. On one of our converted aircraft, we are going to have to raise the GPS antenna with a spacer. This is a helicopter that flies a lot of low level flying, and the drive shaft to the tail rotor is blanking out the signal sometimes. That is how sensitive the signal is. ATC is not keeping track of signal drop out, super computers are. On ground tests can't find this. The ADSB part works or doesn't. Ours go standby/inactive on the ground automatically. I wonder if you tested the Mode S part, at least giving part of the answer. ADSB is just extended Mode S; extra length squitter so position and altitude can be added to Mode S TCAS signal.
     
  7. May 24, 2018 #7

    Charles67

    Charles67

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    Thanks for your reply. I have no direct experience in this. However, after posting my question I found out that Garmin, a maker of ADS-B equipment, strongly recommends ground testing. Probably ground testing will not provide all the answers, but at least in my case it should reduce, if not remove, the need for opening up the airplane to get to components difficult to reach.
     
    Cameron likes this.

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