Aircraft Wiring for Dummies ?

Discussion in 'Electrical & Instrumentation' started by Jerry, Mar 14, 2018.

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  1. Mar 14, 2018 #1

    Jerry

    Jerry

    Jerry

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    Are there any basic (easily readable) books/articles on basic wiring out there?

    I can follow a few diagrams I see in Tony B’s books... but trying to understand what size breaker is needed for the various instruments/radios... Is this something that is listed in the paperwork that you get with the instrument or radio? :confused:
     
  2. Mar 14, 2018 #2

    Jerry

    Jerry

    Jerry

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    Found some basic stuff on the EAA website...
     
  3. Mar 14, 2018 #3

    biplanebob

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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  4. Mar 14, 2018 #4

    Morphewb

    Morphewb

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    Try not to fall for that fuse crap Nuckolls tries to peddle. You don't need too many circuit breakers anyway plus the last thing you want is a spare fuse or three rattling around doing akro. Lots of good stuff in there other than that bit of misinformation.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2018 #5

    Randy

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    I just purchased "Aircraft Wiring Guide" by Marc Ausman Aircraftwiringguide.com
    Reasonably basic, lots of easy to understand diagrams, 80 pages (8.5"x11") in a coil wire binded form notebook so it is easy to fold open.
    Seeing a schematic for a whole plane is a little over whelming for me. This book diagrams individual circuits with good descriptions.
    If you have a good understanding of electricity this book is probably a little to basic. If you don't have a good understanding of electrics this book is perfect.
    I think I got it on Amazon ?
     
  6. Mar 14, 2018 #6

    Jerry

    Jerry

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    Thanks, guys.

    Those articles I found on the EAA site are pretty simple to understand. They’re written by Ron Alexander.
     
  7. Mar 14, 2018 #7

    Randy

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    Also a lot of good aircraft wiring info on u-tube
     
  8. Mar 14, 2018 #8

    IanJ

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    The articles should cover this, but the most important point about circuit breakers or fuses: they are spec'd to match the wiring, not the load (radio, xponder, light, whatever). They're there to keep the wires from catching fire. So if you run wire that's rated for 10A, you connect it to a 10A or smaller breaker. That way, the wire never carries more than its rated load, and it never bursts into flames.

    That's why you never want to replace a fuse/breaker with a bigger one, since you'd be eating into whatever safety factor the engineer hopefully added to the wiring, and it's not very hard to exceed it.

    For wiring your own plane, most equipment will come with a power consumption spec, either in watts or in amps (hopefully in amps, since that's what you care about). Add together the amps you want to put on one circuit, and use wire that's rated for at least that number of amps (add a 20-50% safety factor), with a matching breaker. Divide watts by voltage (usually 13.8 if you're on a normal 12v system) to get amps.

    Wire current carrying capacity will be in a table in any good book on wiring, and is also available online, and usually from wire suppliers. If your equipment doesn't include power consumption numbers, the manufacturer can usually supply them, or you can measure it with a multimeter that has an amperage function, or a power supply that has good meters.

    I am also happy to answer any questions you have about wiring, electricity, electronics, etc. The one subject in this forum where I actually have some expertise, and can contribute back. :D
     
  9. Mar 14, 2018 #9

    PittsDriver68

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    Wire size selection should factor in load + distance + safety factor. FAA AC43.13-1B Chapter 11, figures 11-2 and 11-3 provide recommended wire gauges.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
     

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