Building a workshop....

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by Ryan Mactaggart, Aug 5, 2017.

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  1. Aug 5, 2017 #1

    Ryan Mactaggart

    Ryan Mactaggart

    Ryan Mactaggart

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    So if you had the chance to build a workshop from scratch, what would your must haves be?

    The space I am building is a detached garage (man cave). 28'x40'. Single story, scissor trusses for a cathedral ceiling sitting on 12' walls. 12x12 garage door.
    Being in the warmer south of Canada (oxymoron?) I am planning to heat with hydronic heating in 6" wire reinforced slab.

    Electrical will be 100 amp service 220v single phase.

    Things I need to discover is interior finishing.

    For the walls I was thinking of using white barn style steel roofing panel, and then for wall storage make French cleat from 1x6 pine boards.

    If any or you have a scissor car lift, I would like to know what you think of it.

    I am looking at a fixed 60 gallon compressor and hard plumbing shop air. There are air piping kits out there, (Maxline Tubing 3/4") but I was thinking of using 1" black steel pipe. Any suggestions?

    Lighting is likely to be regular fluorescent tube.

    Not forgetting internet or maybe tv, I am going to bury in a line from the house.

    Any "likes" in your shop you cannot do without, or wishes you had.

    Thanks,
    Ryan
     
  2. Aug 5, 2017 #2

    taff

    taff

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    *Think light = enough lighting. You want good quality light with hardly any shadows. You will not be sorry

    *Heat = it's tough to work in a cold shop
    *Cold = I also have air conditioning. without that I couldn't work 4 to 5 months out of the year in a closed workshop (it's hot and humid in Atlanta)

    This is your aircraft factory for the next ----years. A dismal workshop is not a happy workshop. It should be a place you want to be and not a place you have to go to.

    *Natural light = Your building this workshop, don't forget some windows, Not facing south if possible =too much sharp blinding light.
    Northern light is better quality.
    Windows because it feels good to not feel in a cave.
    It's a start :)
     
  3. Aug 5, 2017 #3

    IanJ

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    Lighting was a big thing for my new shop. I have a 12x20' space (lot constraints prevent going any bigger, alas), and I have 10 LED flourescent-alike fixtures for the main space, and two for the attic area. I also have three fixed roof lights angled south -- upon reflection I could have been happy with them being angled north, but it's not a huge deal, and I'll be happier in the winter. It's bright as noon in there when I flip the switch, and no shadows anywhere.

    I am putting as much of my shop as I can on wheels to facilitate easy reconfiguration. This will be necessary as I move from ribs to wings to fuselage. My welding station is relatively fixed due to extra fireproofing on the wall there, but everything else can move.

    I wish I had AC in the space, though heat will be more important most of the year. I put in shredded-blue-jeans insulation, R19ish if I recall correctly, and it was noticeably cooler than ambient this morning. Walls are gypsum wallboard with no spackle or paint, to simplify future modifications, and point the way to studs for the installation of things on the walls. I included a steel beam near the big door to simplify lifting an engine onto a fuselage, but I don't know if it will work or not -- it only added about $250 to the construction cost, so it was a worthwhile gamble. I added an oversized exhaust fan in the attic (open rafters, so no impediment to airflow) with automatic shutters. I have a zillion electrical outlets, all at about elbow level and every three studs, with three separate circuits among the 120 outlets, and three separate 240 circuits, one on each wall.

    I agree that it should be a comfortable space you want to be in, or building an airplane will become a torture test. Mine is only partway there, and will be limited in its comfort due to the small size, but includes reasonable amenities for what it is.
     
  4. Aug 5, 2017 #4

    Knight Twister

    Knight Twister

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    Floor heat as you mentioned, lots of electrical outlets and air outlets. As much insulation as you can afford. Two post car lift is for so much more than cars. They are very useful for lifting anything. And most important, as big as you can build. Two things in life you can't have too much of, money and shop space.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2017 #5

    Dennis5678

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    Unless you rich, it will take years to equip your work shop with tools.
    Buy them as you need them. My first work shop was 24'X24' so I could fit my project assymbled inside. My second one just a little smaller. But they are right you can't have enough lights. My Walls were not finished with anything but the inside of the T-111 ply. Live in Jacksonville Fla so heating was not a problem. Had huge door opposite end and windows to let the beeze come through. Funny thing while working one night an Owl flew through the workshop.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2017 #6

    swervin

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    Hey Ryan,

    I'm just finishing up my shop at this time. I used 1/2" plywood for my interior walls on the recommendation of a friend. That way you can hang things anywhere on the walls unlike sheet rock. I used all 2x6 construction, I put R22 in the walls and sheeting overtop of that with 1.5" foam board insulation. I blew R60 insulation in the attic. All my outlets are 20 AMP so never have an issue blowing breakers. I live outside of North Bay and could heat the shop with a small propane heater. It's just under 1600 sq ft. Look on Kijiji in the Toronto area for a compressor, I found a nice 60 gallon one for a $100 last year.
     
  7. Aug 5, 2017 #7

    Neil

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    It is nice to have the actual work area separated from the remainder of the building. An area with fabrication tools and enough space to build the fuselage and wings and the remainder of the shop big enough to do assembly. That way you only have to heat or cool a smaller area for most of the build time. Also, have the building be as maintenance free as possible. My shop is rather decorative to the landscape and the neighbors love it but I have lost a lot of airplane build time to maintaining the building.

    Acouple of ideas in this thread; A place to work
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
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  8. Aug 5, 2017 #8

    EAABipe40FF

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    "Bottom feeder" perspective.

    My shop is my $50/month hangar. Plenty of light when the doors are open. One electric outlet so I use extension cords. Most tools are air. No heat, no AC except for fans. I manage to work anytime it's over about 40F. Recently for example I can manage to work 20-30 min. with towel around my neck to wipe sweat, then dry off in front of fan drinking cold something. Worst thing is sweating all over the airplane. Alternate way of drying out is to take the other airplane for a ride.

    I own a big old barn and recently purchased the lot next to it. I considered converting it into a shop with addition into the new lot. Indeed I considered making it into a shop when I got back into flying 10 years ago.

    I made the same decision then as I did again recently. The money I would spend on making a shop is the money I NEED to build the airplane!

    It's 20 miles to the airport so travel expense is a negative but I ride the motorcycle if over 50F.

    I have a passion for building so I just get up ever morning the honey do list can wait and go put in 4-6 hours. Only cheap hangar makes it work. Wouldn't work if I wasn't retired.

    I had a home shop when I was building 40 years ago. Didn't work, too many distractions. As soon as a hangar was available I moved to the airport.

    Got to go....the airplane is waiting.

    Jack
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  9. Aug 5, 2017 #9

    Randy

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    Ryan,
    Knight Twister has it correct - "build a workshop twice as big as you think you need, it should hold at least 1/2 of your stuff."
    IanJ's electric plan is about right, never enough electric outlets
    I have 6" thick walls with foam-in-place insulation. Works excellent and quiet
    I have used 3/4" PVC air lines at 120 lbs. for probably 20 years and never had a problem. Much easier to work with - have drains at all low spots
    I put a wanted ad in the local paper for sliding patio doors and got much more response than I bargained for. I took them apart and used the double insulated glass for windows. South wall has 6 vertical panes approx. 3'x6' each. (Set the glass in the sun for an hour or so. If they fog up the seal is broken)
    I have double bulb 8' fluorescent lighting spaced 6' apart on a 10' ceiling. I am in the process of switching to LED. Much more light and much cheaper to operate.
    I have 3 ea. 3'x8' roll around work tables. Each is wired with two elect. outlets on each side. Only need one extension cord to the table instead of one cord for every appliance. I put everything I could on wheels and glad I did.
    My only question is your plan to use steel for the walls. I have painted OSB and like it because I can add or remove shelving etc. very easily. I go to the local construction salvage yard for interior bifold doors as they make excellent shelves at $2 each.
    Heat in floor is excellent. I could have had it as we later installed an outdoor wood furnace - wish I had know the plan from the start :( Probably the biggest complaint of my shop, the floors are cold and so are my feet.
    I have a stereo system - no TV. Stereo I can listen as I work, TV, I have to stop to watch :)
     
  10. Aug 5, 2017 #10

    NDTOO

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    Water closet? That's a bathroom to us south of the border! :p my shop is about 75 yards from the house and is not plumbed. What a pain when it's 25 below and you have to make the treck to the house!
     
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  11. Aug 5, 2017 #11

    Randy

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    Oh yeah, I have a small, seperate office with desk, file cabinet, 8" deep shelves for small airplane parts storage / toilet / sink / 1st. aid cabinet. Has 7' ceiling so I have 3' more storage above for airplane 'stuff.'
    Also have a seperate room for compressor and lots of storage. Keeps stuff out of the "working shop."
     
  12. Aug 5, 2017 #12

    Ryan Mactaggart

    Ryan Mactaggart

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    The front 2/3 of floor space is open floor to ceiling, the back 1/3 is enclosed with 8' ceiling and loft above. This gives me a storage area above. I thought I would put my desk up there.

    Jack, say your rent again! ;)

    The only restriction my wife has on the shop is that it looks like it matches the house. So it will have same siding, and a porch and some landscaping.

    The walls are going to be insulated R24. Floor insulated R10. Ceiling insulated R50.

    Can't beat black pipe for price when it comes to air, but I hear that galvanized steel pipe also works well. Any comments on galvanized pipe?
     
  13. Aug 5, 2017 #13

    taff

    taff

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    Go with galvanized, little corrosion inside. That's what the industry uses.

    If you want to get posh, look at aluminum. There are a couple of companies doing (selling) this kind of system.
    Go to your local car refinish wholesaler supplier and ask.
    http://www.parker.com/portal/site/P...toid=75547f71ad65e210VgnVCM10000048021dacRCRD
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  14. Aug 5, 2017 #14

    Ryan Mactaggart

    Ryan Mactaggart

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  15. Aug 5, 2017 #15

    StinsonPilot

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    I did my walls in white peg board. I can hang pictures, tools or what ever where I want. I insulated behind the peg boards.
     
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  16. Aug 5, 2017 #16

    Knight Twister

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    Everybody has their preferences but I built my shop for comfort and utility. I like being in my shop more than in my house so I have equipped my shop accordingly. I have a indoor plumbing just like the Clampetts and a small office with cable TV and internet. The TV has about 30 music channels so that is my music source. A workshop separate from the house is important for me as most of my work is done on the back side of the clock when the normal people are sleeping. 34 years of being a cargo pilot keeps your body clock wacked up.
     
  17. Aug 5, 2017 #17

    EAABipe40FF

    EAABipe40FF

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    My hangar holds both airplanes and I could probably squeeze in a Pitts. $50 / month. I pay any electric over the $8 base.

    Jack

    GEDC4095 (800x600).jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2017
  18. Aug 6, 2017 #18

    cvairwerks

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    Ryan: Sice you are going to use infloor heating, plan in for the lift you are going use from the start. Do the floor lay out and site the lift, so that you can avoid running the heater lines where the lift needs to be. It will bum your day installing the lift and hit a line!

    Also, forget using PVC. There is not a PVC out there that is rated for air use. Doesn't matter how many people tell you that they have done it and nothing happened. It will fail and when it does, it's like a bomb going off and shrapnel goes everywhere. Iron pipe or one of the aluminum kits, such as RapidAIr or similar is pretty easy. If you are a glutton for punishment, then copper is available.

    There are plenty of guides out there on setting up the air system, just tailor it to your needs and have at it. The biggie to remember is make draining the compressor easy, and use a flexible section between the compressor and the hard mounted piping to reduce vibration.
     
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  19. Aug 6, 2017 #19

    Steve H

    Steve H

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    All I know about space is simple...no matter how big you build it you will fill it up and want more space! I have a 40x64x9 and would love some more!

    Steve H
     
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  20. Aug 6, 2017 #20

    Ryan Mactaggart

    Ryan Mactaggart

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    Yup, looked at that with the pex layout. Local Plumbing supply store does free hydronic design/heat loss engineering. Hoping to have the layout this week.

    My shop blue prints passed the local county office pretty fast. Permit is in hand. All the trades are booked, and breaking ground is scheduled Aug 28th, Lets hope the weather cooperates and the trades show up!
     

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