Canopy protection

Discussion in 'Fabric & Paint' started by Randy, Mar 10, 2018.

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  1. Mar 10, 2018 #1

    Randy

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    What is the best protection for a canopy while it is being installed. I have used contact paper in the past but was hoping for something a little less labor intensive.
    Thank you,
     
  2. Mar 10, 2018 #2

    Beej

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    i used pva wood glue. Smeared it on. It peels off in sheets.
     
  3. Mar 10, 2018 #3

    PittsDriver68

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    Very interesting. Never saw that suggested in any plastic handling instructions or in any aviation or woodworking source. Do you use water to get it to start peeling?

    Wes
     
  4. Mar 10, 2018 #4

    smizo

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    I just used good 3m masking tape.
     
  5. Mar 10, 2018 #5

    Beej

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    No, it just peeled off. I was dubious at first, someone suggested it on the interweb, so I tried it on part of a damaged canopy, worked like a charm.
     
  6. Mar 10, 2018 #6

    Cameron

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    I used bubble wrap with a layer of masking paper over it.
     
  7. Mar 10, 2018 #7

    Randy

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    "i used pva wood glue. Smeared it on. It peels off in sheets."

    Beej, when something sounds to good (easy) to be true it usually is so please supply just a little more information ?

    I just 'studied up' a little on the internet, seems like plain Elmers fits the bill or something made especially for making slime ?

    You didn't coat the plexiglass with anything first ? Just lifted a corner of dried glue and peeled ? Didn't 'craze' the glass at all ? Why is this procedure just now coming to light ?
    You just trying to slow me down so you can get yours flying first ??
    Thank you,
     
  8. Mar 10, 2018 #8

    Beej

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    I used titebond original wood glue. I did this and read about the tip years back. Try a test piece... :0)
     
  9. Mar 10, 2018 #9

    Beej

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    Couple years later, on the wind shield I used electrical tape, cos I had no wood glue at hand... :)
     
  10. Mar 10, 2018 #10

    Chuck

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    Beej, did you brush or roll on? Full strength or diluted?
     
  11. Mar 11, 2018 #11

    Beej

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    Brushed, out the bottle. I just did a quick google after all these years; seems the kit modelers often use Elmer's glue instead of 'liquid masking' agents for tiny canopies and windows on their models. Here is a proper masking agent: https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXC099

    I guess the reason the glue doesn't adhere to the perspex is due to the slickness of the material. I never tried it on lexan.
     
  12. Mar 13, 2018 #12

    Lotahp1

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    Do not use 3M blue fine line tape on plexiglass and then leave it on for awhile. It’s ok for quick tape off and paint or edge seal etc. I’ve used it on several...a lot. And notice you can always see where it was. It’s odd. I use 3M green tape when taping off for paint or sealing. Get about 1/8” from the edge then use the blue fine line tape to make the actual tape off edge. Works good. Just be careful using it and letting it sit for awhile. They also make a liquid Latex that you can spray on. It’s actually what a lot of canopy’s etc are shipping in. If I had a $$$$ canopy I was fitting etc...I’d look and order the correct latex stuff it protects awesome.
     
  13. Mar 13, 2018 #13

    planebuilder

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    I think "Spraylat" is the latex you are thinking of. I used to use it to protect windshields for shipping. It was very expensive but worked ok, if left on for too long, like years, it can be difficult to remove. Being latex, it is also soft, so protects from "minor" impacts and abrasion.
    The PVA method Beej used is very interesting, I'm in the middle of an experiment with it, can probably tell more tomorrow, but it might be less expensive and potentially better protection.
     
  14. Mar 17, 2018 #14

    Randy

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    Beej, good thing I did your suggested glue test.
    Elmers glue brushed on, dried 3 days, on glass. Absolutely no way it was going to peel off. I removed it with a razor blade paint scraper in very, very small chunks.
    Any good suggestions on how I make an improvement here?

    I am interested in how the test 'planebuilder' said he was doing. If his results are no better than mine I will probably try a can of the "spraylat" he suggested.
     
  15. Mar 17, 2018 #15

    Beej

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    Well, I didn't use Elmer's glue...and I didn't do it on 'glass'......

    A tests' parameters need to be exactly the same as the real thing in order to get a true result. Isn't there a piece of your canopy that will be hidden by a skirt, or to be cut off? Do it in that location.
     
  16. Mar 18, 2018 #16

    planebuilder

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    I brushed some Lepage's carpenters glue on new Plexiglas right after removing the original masking. On part I just used the glue, on half I saturated a scrap of old bed sheet in the glue. After a day of drying I tried to peel the glue. The plain glue was hard to get a loose edge to grab to lift. The fabric in the glue gave a chance to lift an edge, then the rest peeled easily. On inspection I found where the glue was thin, around the edges, it broke from the thick glue and remained stuck on the plexi. Under the area that had the saturated fabric, there were some small areas of residue. I think there wasn't enough glue and although the fabric looked fully wet, it had wicked up glue away from the plexi, leaving tiny bubbles under the fabric. I assume those bubble areas separated the glue left on the plexi from the glue saturating the fabric, and due to this separation, the residue was left behind as the fabric/glue peeled. Maybe a lower quality glue would release easier.

    IMG_3435.jpg

    IMG_3436.jpg
     
  17. Mar 18, 2018 #17

    planebuilder

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    Part 2, to avoid the wicking issue, I brushed more glue, on the same area, without fabric and let it dry. Then I brushed on more glue over the dry glue, and applied the fabric, saturating it with the 2nd coat of glue. When it dried I peeled it off. It came off easily and removed the residue previously left behind. So far the best results are with 2 coats of glue and fabric in the 2nd coat. The "bed sheet" wets out quickly and is easy to apply. It makes it easier to remove the glue, and also creates a much better layer of protection than I found with spraylat. I would like to try a cheaper glue, hoping for a bit less adhesion. I also wonder what would happen if I waxed the plexi first.

    IMG_3437.jpg

    IMG_3438.jpg
     
  18. Mar 18, 2018 #18

    Larry Lyons

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    Without reviewing didn’t the early poster call out yellow glue. It is thicker with more body than the white.
     
  19. Apr 5, 2018 #19

    Randy

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    Test results:
    1) 2 coats of Elmers white, water soluble school glue brushed on plexiglass
    2) 1 coat of Elmers, let dry. Another coat of Elmers with linen sandwiched between coats as per PlaneBuilder's test.

    Results were that both tests peeled easily and very cleanly.

    The only problem I had was the consistency of the glue made it difficult to spread anywhere near evenly so I did a 3rd test.

    3) Thinned the glue approx. 10% with water and heated it to 85 degrees in my epoxy heating insulated box. This time the glue spread very easily and evenly and peeled the same as the first 2 tests.

    I did like the test using linen as I felt it protected a little better probably because it was much stiffer but not sure it would be worth the extra effort to apply.

    Another plus is after the glue has dried it is easily marked up using a pensil or felt marker when doing screw layouts etc. It does take 2 coats for sufficient coverage and it takes 2 days to completely dry.

    So there you have it, BeeJ was right, it really works. My only question is why he didn't tell us about this years ago :)
     
  20. Apr 5, 2018 #20

    taff

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    Maybe you can use this product?

    The industry use it on polycarbonate sign faces.
    I have used a product named Grip Mask (same sort of material.) You can get a good film build from it and good plexi protection if your storing the canopy.
    Do not leave the canopy in direct sunlight for any length of time with this sort of product on it. It will be a nut cracker to remove the masking.

    If you know of a sign shop that paints the back lit signs (like Burger King) ask them nicely for a gallon of the liquid masking they use.

    https://www.coastairbrush.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Spray_Mask_by_Spraylat&cat=331
     

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