• The Biplane Forum is a large global active community of biplane builders, owners and pilots. From Pitts to Skybolts, to older barnstormers, all types are welcome. In addition to our active community, our content boasts exhaustive technical information which is often sought after for projects and maintenance. This information has accumulated over the 12+ years the forum has been in existence.

    The Biplane Forum is a private community. Subscriptions are only $29.95/year to gain access to this great community and unmatched source of information not found anywhere else on the web. We are also a great resource for non biplane users, since many GA aircraft are built the same way (fabric and tube construction).

  • If you have bought, sold or gained information from our Classifieds, please donate to Biplane Forum and give back.

    You can become a Supporting Member which comes with a decal or just click here to donate.

Control Stick

DennisV

Registered Users
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2018
Messages
646
Reaction score
170
This control stick was in with the Starduster project. I am told it came out of an F4, but cannot confirm that. Seems to be in good shape except that one corner of the hat switch is broken off. $75 plus shipping?

IMG_20210105_132506.jpg
IMG_20210105_132511.jpg
IMG_20210105_132516.jpg
 

Larry Lyons

Registered Users
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 1, 2012
Messages
4,791
Reaction score
1,291
Location
NW Illinois
I'll take it! PM on it's way. We, my company, are involved in putting an F-4 on a stick in Lena, IL. We donated our crane to lift it off the truck and assemble it when it came in and will set up on the stick when they are ready.
 

Timbob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Messages
1,106
Reaction score
271
Location
Socorro, NM USA
I used to work on those (44 years ago), don't remember that shaft configuration, it was basically a power steering fighter using SAS to keep it going the way the pilot wanted. A working autopilot not a requirement to launch but SAS, YES. The grip is probably common in that era of aircraft so, sure?
 

Larry Lyons

Registered Users
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 1, 2012
Messages
4,791
Reaction score
1,291
Location
NW Illinois
Our F-8 wasn’t quite that bad but there was a black box(I was a Jet Mech so didn't touch them) that would just blip the rudder, not position it, as long as the rudder pedal was pushed. If that was inop the Plane was restricted to sub sonic speed as the F-8 would swap ends if the tail got to far out of trail. So the rudder just flicked the direction the pilot wanted and return to neutral. Fly by wire hadn’t arrived yet in those days.
 

n7472h

Active Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
56
I wouldn't know this stick's origins, but it looks very much like a stick fabricated by a rather rotund man for his clipwing Cub, to fit around his belly. He assembled a mockup of conjoined toilet paper tubes, sat in the airplane, and formed them around his torso. This put the top of the stick at his chest, he liked the extra control authority.
 

DennisV

Registered Users
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2018
Messages
646
Reaction score
170
As I recall, the first fly-by-wire fighter WAS an F8 -- fitted with a secondary FBW control system to see if it could be made to work, and was first flown by Phil Oestreicher. Phil was also the first to fly the F16 (with its revolutionary FBW system), and if you haven't seen this video, it's a classic. An incredible example of a really cool piece of flying in a design that is totally new and untested. Suffice to say that his narrative on this video is the "PR" version, but to hear him tell the full story is even more remarkable.

 

Latest posts

Top