Easy Eagle

Discussion in 'Other Types' started by Larry Hoesing, Oct 3, 2018.

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  1. Oct 8, 2018 #21

    lakeracer69

    lakeracer69

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    Are you using Oxy/Acetylene or TIG?
     
  2. Oct 9, 2018 #22

    Larry Hoesing

    Larry Hoesing

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    Oxy - Acetylene
     
  3. Oct 9, 2018 #23

    Johnny Canuck

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    Kevin, the only direct way and the only way I know is just send a request to the moderator who responds to requests to join the group. I'll take a look but it maybe wouldn't hurt just to fire off another request. My acceptance only came after a few days and it was on my second request. I don't think he may check his email very often. I believe he was one of the first to get into the EE1 and started the group. I have a contact in Nebraska who is a builder. I'll pick his brain but I believe I did before and I received the same advice I've just posted. Another avenue would be to send an email to the guy that sells the plans and fittings along with VW engines. Great Plains Aircraft. email: info@greatplainsas.com or there maybe a link on the site you can follow. The owner is Steve Bennett, www.easyeagle.com
    These last 2 thoughts is where I would start. Steve and his wife run the business and he does the engine building so his reply may be tardy as well. Hope this helps.
    P.S. If a bunch of us are going to be using this site for the EE1. I think it only fair that we contribute financially to it. Data memory isn't free. Someone has to pay the bills. lol
     
  4. Oct 9, 2018 #24

    Dana

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    I would say unless you're prepared to re-analyze the entire design, stick with the drawings unless there's a known problem with the design. Washout prevents tip stall, varying incidence of the top and bottom is something else again.
     
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  5. Oct 9, 2018 #25

    Johnny Canuck

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    I am building to plans as I know the original built by the designer flew and the plans came from that aircraft. It had the cub style landing gear which was changed over to a one piece bent aluminum. This, I believe was when Great Plains Aircraft took over the design rights and plan sales. The newer style landing gear is in their catalogue. I think, but just guessing, that the chaps at Sonnex Aircraft assisted with bending the aluminum. Steve Bennett started building an EE1 but sold his project to a chap in Nebraska and may have switched to a Sonex. I am sticking with the original design and will figure out the proper dimensions for the gear once my fuselage is finished being welded together or I take the time to do so. I am not sure which will come first. lol.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2018 #26

    race38

    race38

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    Steve Bennett succumbed to Cancer. The gent he sold GPAS to also passed recently. The business is up for sale.
     
  7. Oct 9, 2018 #27

    Larry Hoesing

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    That would explain why the business is not very responsive . Emails tend to go unanswered. I'm not sure it would be a good time to order an engine. Hopefully things get sorted out soon. Scott Casler at Hummel seem to be on the ball and very helpful.
     
  8. Oct 9, 2018 #28

    Larry Hoesing

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    Thanks Dana , I don't know of a problem with the design and there probably isn't one. I just wondered if one was better than the other for a more forgiving stall. The Baby Lakes uses the differing angles and it is a very successful design with many examples flying over many years. The one EE example (after a very short flying life) is hanging in a hanger somewhere from the ceiling. Not really a confidence builder for the design. So yes I am questioning, if there is a fault that can be changed now is the time to do it. The EE is very close to the design of the B Lakes with a Clark Y foil instead of the NACA M3 . The EE stands a bit taller on its gear and there is a bit more gap between the wings.
     
  9. Oct 9, 2018 #29

    Johnny Canuck

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    Sorry to hear that Steve Bennett has passed away or gone West as some say in some aviation circles. I found him knowledgeable and great to deal with.
    ee1bk.jpg ee1frt.jpg ee1side.jpg
     
  10. Oct 9, 2018 #30

    IanJ

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    I've re-welded over pinholes with OA. If you're worried about it, make some sample joints and test them to destruction. See if the re-welded joint is noticeably easier to break than the single-welded joint. I did that with some of my early weld attempts just to make sure I was doing things right. I'll note that I am not an experienced welder, I'm only about a year in to occasionally welding, and I definitely don't know the finer points of welding. What I usually see people saying is that if a weld is junk, grind it out and completely re-weld it, but I suspect they're talking about actually bad cold welds and such rather than minor problems like pinholes.

    For whatever it's worth, I've found pinholes are less of a problem if I go a little slower, and concentrate on using the torch to herd around my puddle, rather than rushing ahead to melt new metal. You might also go up a tip size if you're consistently getting pinholes, as I think they come about from not getting a complete melt going. I still definitely get them in tubing joints, though, particularly in acute angles where it's hard to maneuver the torch (and maybe I need to go up a tip size, too).
     
  11. Oct 10, 2018 #31

    Larry Hoesing

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  12. Oct 10, 2018 #32

    Larry Hoesing

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    Thanks IanJ, I think I am about ready to start welding the fuselage soon, that's the fun est part! Like the frosting.:D
     
  13. Oct 10, 2018 #33

    IanJ

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    Congrats, enjoy! There is some interesting discussion I've seen about welding the fuselage in a spiral from the tail to avoid warping. If you haven't already, you might search around the forum for discussions of welding a fuselage.
     
  14. Oct 12, 2018 at 3:02 AM #34

    Larry Hoesing

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    The Vertical Stabilizer on the EE is a bit small. This from someone that has flown it approximately 40 hrs. The EE is about 16.5% smaller than the Ragwing Special 286 sq in for the EE, 330 sq in for the Ragwing Special for a 54 sq in difference. It visually looks smaller than most other small biplane V stab's.
    I was thinking about increasing the area about 40 sq in. Does this sound reasonable ? Would there be any foreseeable problems? Thanks
     
  15. Oct 12, 2018 at 12:02 PM #35

    Johnny Canuck

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    Larry your ahead of me on this plan upgrade. I have never delved into the area size the way you have figuring out the square inches of it or other craft. My project has been in a holding pattern for quite some time now. I just felt that I would get back at it this fall and started by cleaning up all the bolt on fitting for cables and getting them in aircraft zinc oxide primer.
    After I retired I've been busy working on our home, property and building a garage. The last 2 years we have spent 6 months in Florida. I purchased a new Lincoln 200 square wave inverter Tig welder a couple of years ago and have to spend some time getting the hang of it. It had just come new on the market and was a good deal at its introductory price and I wanted to get proficient enough with it to be able to do my own 4130 as well as the .050 aluminum which I have purchased for the fuel tank.
    I have my tail feathers jigged up and both sides of my fuselage cut to dimension with one still in the jig. My plan was to just have a look at the vertical stabilizer and just extended the top forward some giving it a little tighter radius before bring it down to the fuselage. I'll have to sit down at a later date with a trig. calculator to figure out the increased area. lol .40 square inches seems appropriate enough of an increase and still give it a nice appearance. I may have to re do my rudder to match them up a little closer in looks. Not really a problem at all.
    I went through my plans after I got them and purchased most, if not all of the AN bolts an turn buckles etc. from Aircraft Spruce while I was still working and am glad I did as inflation has driven up their cost.
    View attachment 44112 View attachment 44113 View attachment 44112 View attachment 44113 View attachment 44112 View attachment 44113 View attachment 44112 View attachment 44113
     

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  16. Oct 14, 2018 at 3:47 PM #36

    Larry Hoesing

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    So I made the decision to rebuild the remaining 3 wings, The work the previous builder did just wasn't going to work for me . I did decide to salvage some of the piece s . It turned out to be an education in the susceptibility of epoxy to heat. I warmed the epoxy and pulled the pieces apart . Warmed again and scraped the epoxy off.
    my conclusion was - no dark paint on the top of the wings!
     
  17. Oct 15, 2018 at 12:25 PM #37

    Johnny Canuck

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    Maybe this is why we don't see many, if any, very dark coloured aircraft. This is something that never really occurred to me. I once seen a tube, wood and fabric being built in London Ontario where the gentleman was using epoxy and tiny brass nails to hold the gussets on the wings. That was a time consuming labour of love.
    Red is the darkest I've seen with a great number of white, yellow and some with blue accents. Happiness will result in the long run as it will be all your build. Did you use a heat gun to remove the epoxy and approximately what temperature was needed to remove it? Did you pull all your ribs apart too Larry?
    I just epoxied my ribs together and held the gussets in place with 3-5 1/4" inch staples which I removed after the epoxy cured. Spar varnish fills the tiny staple holes. If I was starting all over again, I would spray my spar varnish on rather than brushing it. Tends to go on a little too heavy when you brush. Wisdom dictates 3 coats with a light sanding in between the 1st. and 2nd. coats. I have my first coat on and am trying to get motivated to sand them down. It gets on a little heavy in all the nooks and crannies of the gussets and trailing edges. I have purchased a inexpensive spray gun from Princess Auto to do the remaining 2 coats. It took the better part of that litre on the new wood to do all 4 wings and ailerons. Kevin Wilkinson said the sanding was his wings down was his least favorite task when building. Think ahead when getting ready to varnish as some of the dope and finishing materials will only adhere to that systems wood varnish. ie. Poly systems. I used $40.00/litre spar varnish to do my first coat. So far I'm planning on using the water based Stewart's system on my fabric and adherence will not be a problem with this varnish.
    I've thrown in the pictures of the 2" oak blocks that I used a lathe to radius out the diameter of the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer and assembled into the jig I sent you the picture of. I lathed out 3 different sizes while I had use of the wood lathe I borrowed. Just sending along for your perusal.
     

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  18. Oct 15, 2018 at 1:09 PM #38

    EAABipe40FF

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    8415d1403526124-red-black-biplane-imageuploadedbybiplane-forum1403526126_661476.jpg There are many Red and Black aircraft. SS-Travel-Air-1-med.jpg 8413d1403524624-red-black-biplane-stearman01.jpg
     
  19. Oct 15, 2018 at 9:43 PM #39

    Larry Hoesing

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    I saved the spars& cut them up for the new strips. I first cut the ribs off with the band saw within 1\8 to 1\4" of the spar. I then waved a butane torch over the remaining wood careful not to scorch the wood. pried the wood off with a wood chisel. Reheated it a bit with the torch and the wood chisel peels the remaining epoxy off with little effort. I did not check the temp, but I was surprised at how little heat it took to get it to let go and scrap off. On the System 3 site it says the Maximum Service Temperature is 160°F (71°C) for T88. That's not all that hot. How hot could the interior of a wing, with no air circulation and painted black get? If I was wanting to paint the tops of my wings dark I would do that experiment. If nothing else I would like to treat the expensive wing wood with a little respect. high temps will do it no good.
    I am not sure yet how cover the wood. I haven't completely decided on fabric covering. I am inclined to go with sanding the wood and then one good coat of epoxy. Paint it on wipe off the excess with a small squeegee. The quickest might be to wipe it on with a rag.
     
  20. Oct 15, 2018 at 10:22 PM #40

    Johnny Canuck

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    Larry, You might want to check with the D.O.T or one of the EAA Canadian Chapters regarding finishing your wings. You will need to have them and the rest of your airplane signed off before any covering. Be sure to keep a building log of your progress and document your hours spent. A photo album would be useful for the inspector as well. I just use a scribbler to keep track of my time. It helps verify the 51% rule of you building your craft. Home building rules in Canada are a little more stringent then those of the U.S.A. Just some food for thought.
     

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