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Recently De-Registered Starduster Too For Sale

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Len R

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For sale:

STARDUSTER TOO OPEN-COCKPIT TWO-PLACE BIPLANE

Original owner/builder

Recently de-registered but fully assembled, and routinely run and taxied

Selling fully assembled or in parts; engine/prop must go first.

Plans and paperwork included

Hangared at Chester County Airport in PA (KMQS).



Fully assembled airplane: $22,500 (includes engine/prop, accessories, and many extras)

Engine/prop and accessories only: $26,500


Lycoming IO-540 C4B5

S/N L-2224-48

250 HP

TSMOH 418 hours

Compression 70-70-70-68-68-75

Christen 801 inverted oil system

Oil analysis results: green all categories

Accessories installed and included


Hartzell constant speed aerobatic prop

Hub model HC-C2YK-4CF; S/N AU9731B

Blade design FC8477A-7; S/N K27814, K27815

Governor F-6-5-A

Spinner included


Received temporary A/W certificate 2007

First flight 2008

Certificated 2009

Deregistered 2018

TTAF 69 hours


Other:

Streamlined flying/landing wires and stabilizer wires

Tail brace

Starduster tailwheel.

New style landing gear.

Rectangular wings (Great Lakes design) with ailerons on lower wings.

PS Engineering PM 1200 IntelliVOX High Noise Application intercom.

Microair T2000 SFL transponder.

Microair M760 transceiver.

Wheel pants included (off airplane).

Many extras and spare parts.


Len R.
 

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Len R

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It appears you'd prefer to keep the plane intact... So would I.
How do I get in touch?
703-674-7471
It appears you'd prefer to keep the plane intact... So would I.
How do I get in touch?
703-674-7471
Thanks, Mike, for your note.

Yes, it would be preferable to sell it intact.

I'd be happy to call to talk further. Best time/day?... perhaps later today or tomorrow?

Best,

Len
 

cactusav8r

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You’re wanting to keep it intact, why deregister? Just makes it much harder to actually keep it together, doesn’t it?
 

EAABipe40FF

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My thoughts exactly, why in the world de-register? Chances are it might be parted out for the engine anyway?
 

Hinckley Bill

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I'm probably way off base, but wouldn't de-registration relieve the owner from any/all liability for the plane going forward, as the airworthiness certificate for the aircraft under this owner becomes 'invalid' upon de-registration, requiring the new owner to obtain a new airworthiness certificate?
 

EAABipe40FF

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I agree that relief from liability is likely the goal but I suspect fear of liability on E-AB is not only overblown but a lawyer will probably find a way to get you anyway.

Indeed, right here is a public record of the aircraft with N-number offered for sale so what exactly is hidden? I don't believe re-registration is problem but a new AWC is problematic. I hate to see a decent airplane thrown into the trash bin.

Jack
 
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TFF1

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Deregistered is one thing. Removing the ability to continue the airworthiness chain is another.
 

wanttaja

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I'm probably way off base, but wouldn't de-registration relieve the owner from any/all liability for the plane going forward, as the airworthiness certificate for the aircraft under this owner becomes 'invalid' upon de-registration, requiring the new owner to obtain a new airworthiness certificate?
That would only be true if the manufacturers of aircraft parts are immune to liability lawsuits...which they aren't. The only way this would work would be to completely break the traceability of the new parts. In other words, prevent future lawyers from finding out what airframe they came from.

Ron Wanttaja
 

PittsDriver68

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The Airworthiness Certificate is for a specific serial number airframe. Deregistering does not invalidate the Airworthiness Certificate. From a regulatory point of view they are two completely separate entities handled by completely different FAA's.

If the owner thinks that deregistering somehow avoids liability they are mistaken. The only method that can avoid liability is to crush all of the parts and deliver them to a landfill.

Best of luck,

Wes
 

EAABipe40FF

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De-register and remove the data plate and the aircraft and therefore the AWC simply doesn't exist anymore. Except for the internet trail one probably couldn't trace it...?
 

PittsDriver68

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My brother-in-law is a liability lawyer. For better or worse I am confident that if he thought that there was a large award out there and the separated parts were used to construct another ship that crashed, he would find a way to track down the original builder of the parts. Hence my comment that the only way to avoid liability is to crush the parts and take the remains to a landfill.

Aviation, including homebuilding, is not for the faint-of-heart. Go fly. Be happy.

Best of luck,

Wes
 

DHonkomp

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Hey Len R, I like your idea, and probably will do the same thing when I can no longer fly. I think that's better than keeping it around till death and then burdening the family. Good Luck with the sale.
 

Dave Baxter

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Many builders have chosen to take their airplanes apart and sell them as parts or cut the airplane up. I know of several cases here locally where this has happened, also a person that bought an airplane from several of the past owners, not the builder was told by his lawyer that if he did any work on it at all he could be liable if the next owner cared to sue after an incident. Essentially what the lawyers do is run an actuary to determine ones net worth, and then if you have something, a nice house on the hill a business and assets they advise their client to sue, they do not care if it is right or wrong, as they know that person will have to hire a lawyer to protect himself and no matter which one wins or looses they both make money! Anyone can sue anyone for anything, if the trail lawyers could find a way to sue regarding EAB aircraft there would be all sorts of law suits litigation pending on the numerous accidents that have taken place regarding these airplanes. What makes it less appealing for lawyers is, it says on the airplane, and on the paperwork it is EXPERIMENTAL, and therefore one pays his money and takes his chances. I know of only two cases where one was sued regarding EAB aircraft and of them one was successful. The John Denver Case was that one, and because of the hi profile name and the fact a lot of money was involved in his estate they named everyone connected to the airplane, and the one that paid, not sure about the amount as it was not to be disclose, it is my understanding that the deep pockets were Aircraft Spruce, as they supplied the kit that the original builder used to build the airplane, not sure who or how much was paid by others that were involved?

The other which did not prevail was against Vans Aircraft over the accident of a RV-10 both had nothing to do with the aircraft or engine. If you have no fuel or compromise the fuel system with red silicone in the fuel lines chances are the airplane engine will not run!

If one worries about getting sued after the airplane is no longer in your care you shouldn't. There are so many other things these days that one should worry about that might occur sooner, I'm with Wes go fly your airplane and let the chips fall where they may. Dave
 

Dana

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I'm probably way off base, but wouldn't de-registration relieve the owner from any/all liability for the plane going forward, as the airworthiness certificate for the aircraft under this owner becomes 'invalid' upon de-registration, requiring the new owner to obtain a new airworthiness certificate?
No.
 

Hinckley Bill

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Folks wonder why folks have such a 'low, low' opinion of the legal profession......this is but one example. I've even been told that if you are disposing of a ladder it had better be cut up into useless pieces, as to not do so may open you up to a lawsuit.....as someone previously posted, "if you have money/assets you're always at risk of being sued!'
 
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