Tig Welding tips and tricks

Discussion in 'Handy Resources' started by VH-ZSJ, Mar 22, 2018.

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  1. Mar 22, 2018 #1

    VH-ZSJ

    VH-ZSJ

    VH-ZSJ

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    I’ve just got a new tig welder to play with in anticipation of starting on my Pitts fuselage. My setup is as follows:
    Unimig razor 200dc pulse welder
    #9 flex head torch with gas lens
    1.6mm tungsten
    Foot pedal
    Yet to pick up gas and a flow meter these are still to come. Got a hold of a nice quality helmet and gloves as well for safety.

    There doesn’t seem to be much on the forum covering TIG settings and consumables. A big help has been Jody’s welding tips and tricks page as well as his channel on YouTube, also mr tigs YouTube channel and pithybikes - bike frames are fairly similar so much the same for welding.

    With filler rod how many use er70s-2 compared to er80s-d2? Jody recommends the 70 where as Mr. Tig recommends 80 I think Miller and Lincoln also disagree. I’d love to see what people are using on their projects! Also how everyone is notching tube. I’m planning on using a hole saw mother for larger tubes and doing smaller tubes by hand/Dremel using the online template maker.
    Cheers,
    Sam
     
  2. Mar 22, 2018 #2

    smizo

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    We use er80sd2 rods for 4130.
     
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  3. Mar 22, 2018 #3

    TFF1

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    I would buy some of both and see if you can tell how they weld. Welding can have style of the way things feel as it happens. I was sent some rod from a manufacturer to do a repair. They were so much better than the welding supply ones. I don't know why. I do just enough welding to be dangerous! True professionals can weld with shoelaces, I have to stack the deck to me. When I show someone the basics, I tell the person your groove is going to be different than mine.
     
  4. Mar 22, 2018 #4

    cwilliamrose

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    I'm using ER80S-D2 as well, haven't tried ER70S. My fuselage was welded with Oxweld 65 which was commonly used in the dark ages.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
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  5. Mar 22, 2018 #5

    DanSalcedo

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    2wings.com has some good stuff on welding
    It's. Pitts model 12site
     
  6. Mar 22, 2018 #6

    StinsonPilot

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    I used 70 on the last job, I'm going to try out 80 on the next one.
    It welded just fine as long as everything is clean. Doing a repair on a previously painted fuselage is hard to get it totally clean.
    I've read that the 80 is better for that, so we'll see.
     
  7. Mar 22, 2018 #7

    IanJ

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    I read here recently that 80 is also better if you're stacking welds, like in a fuselage tube cluster. Something about 70 not wanting to stick to itself too well if you have to go over a weld bead again.
     
  8. Mar 22, 2018 #8

    StinsonPilot

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    Never had that problem.
     
  9. Mar 22, 2018 #9

    Morphewb

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    Maule and ACA, the Decathlon/Scout people welded most everything with MIG. I called Maule years ago and was told they used ER80S D2 wire in the MIG machines. I used that wire in the MIG unit tacking the Model 12 fuselage. I used the same alloy TIG rods for finish welding. Worked out great for me.
     
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  10. Mar 23, 2018 #10

    Snap

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    I'm using ER70S-2 and am very happy with the results. Noticed no difference in weldability to the ER80S-D2, I have both to test them.

    Weldcote Metals also recommends ER70S-2 for 4130, I chatted with them online about a year ago.

    ER70S-2 has a tensile strength of "only" 70000 psi compared to 80000 psi of the ER80S-D2. SAE 4130 has a tensile strength of 66700 (yield) to 81200 (ultimate), therefore in my oppionion as an engineer using ER70S-2 is better to prevent cracks. Since the beads on .035 or .049 tubing are always thicker than the wall of the tube itself the welding won't fail befor the tube does - and with a little more "flexibility" in the weld you can be sure not to have brittle weldings.

    If it comes to repairs I would definitely only use ER70S-2 due to the mentioned facs above, plus it handles impurities way better than ER80S-D2.
     
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  11. Mar 23, 2018 #11

    ioneater

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    Hello and welcome to the adventure. As a recent new comer to the world of Tig, I can say pretty much what Jody says on his YouTube sessions is very accurate. Practice the basics on steel and try not to set unrealistic expectations for yourself. Practice practice practice and you will improve with every bead. If you have access to anyone locally with experience that will be a bonus. After a while you will be able to tell by sound how well your weld is going. Prepping the metal with a Scotch Brite pad or clean wire brush followed by an acetone wipe down has reduced my oopsies lately. Have fun!
     
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  12. Mar 24, 2018 #12

    VH-ZSJ

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    Interesting aca use mig, I think some fuselages going way back may have even been arc welded in certain factories.
     
  13. Mar 24, 2018 #13

    TFF1

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    They were arc welded by Aeronca. Champion changed to MIG. Both times there was learning curves over OA to stop cracking joints. The welder at Champion keeps his hand on the amp adjuster and adjusts it like using a foot pedal on a TIG.
     
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  14. Mar 24, 2018 #14

    Morphewb

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    Look at any 108 series Stinson fuselage. They were all stick welded.
     
  15. Mar 24, 2018 #15

    wapati-bull

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    Try both and see which one works better for you. Like most welding processes you have to give more attention to the puddle than the arc make sure that the edges always wet up and flow. Also undercutting is not acceptable. But no matter how you weld it, the joint is only as strong as the parent material. It does require practice like all welding but once you get on to it , it is not that hard. But preparation and a good fit up is a must. Good luck, Dave
     
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  16. Mar 24, 2018 #16

    cvairwerks

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    Lots of aircraft welding during WW2 was stick. Almost anything that came out of Fairchild, and that did not require tiny welds, was stick.
     
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