Where/when did you take PP check ride?

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by EAABipe40FF, Jan 21, 2018.

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  1. Jan 21, 2018 #1

    EAABipe40FF

    EAABipe40FF

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    And/or you military pilot wings.

    1971 NO6 Laurel Del. John Reed in C150. I had flown there earlier to find it but couldn't on day of ride. I finally call unicom and he asked if I was the green/white 150 that had been flying around? Ride went well but he didn't like my approach to land and took the airplane. He gave it back to me on the ground and I asked if I should take it around again to land?. He said,

    "You know how to land don't you, your'er a PP now you can land all you want to."

    Jack
     
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  2. Jan 21, 2018 #2

    jmorgan

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    My PP check ride was uneventful. My multi check ride 8 hours later was...a learning moment. Examiner took the controls and I thought I'd busted it. Turns out he wanted to teach me a few things and then we did the whole check ride over again. With several more "engine failures." I think I learned more that day than any other day of flying I've had.

    BTW, my instructor was, and still is, an excellent instructor and person. It's not his fault I was a knucklehead that day. But I passed and became a much better pilot for it.

    To answer the original question: College Station, Texas in May of 2012.
     
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  3. Jan 21, 2018 #3

    cactusav8r

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    DCU
    June 81..

    I just graduated High School. I didn't know what I didn't know.
    My Instructor set up the CheckRide.
    NO SIGN OFF.
    NO Airplane PrePrep.
    NO review of Items Missed on my written.
    No Review
    NOTHING....
    Another Instructor took pity on me and signed me off, held my hand.

    Today THAT'S an automatic BUST.

    I still remember the Examiner taking out a cigarette out lighting it while he set up his portable type writer.
    I thought I was done.

    I can't imagine the BUTTOCKS CHEWING that CFI got for it. I never saw him again out at the airport.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
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  4. Jan 21, 2018 #4

    AaronS

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    Now this date I remember because it was my 17th Birthday, in January 1992. Same airport I solo'd at, KCEZ in Cortez, CO. Lynn French was my examiner.

    I was "sick" that day at school and to me it was a much bigger deal than my solo. I can still remember most of the details of the flight and checkride. I nailed everything except one question on the oral, and I still remember what it was; the highest obstacle on the El Paso Sectional is one of the tethered balloons along the border.

    After I passed, Dad gave me a "real" flight jacket. I was in tall cotton. That evening for my birthday dinner I flew Dad's 182 with the family down to the restaurant at the Farmington, NM airportr. My brothers were impressed they got to sit up front.

    A year latter I was taking my CP checkride on the same day, and I got to skip school again. The insurance wouldn't cover me flying Dad's recently purchased Viking, so we rented a "Gutlass" from an FBO at a neighboring airport and I took Mr. French around the patch a couple of times to prove I was competent, then we finished up in a 182.

    As Lynn was signing my temporary certificate he mentioned I was probably the youngest CP in the nation at that time. He was probably right. A few months later in AOPAPilot there was a blurb about some kid in Florida that had earned his CP on his 17th birthday in February and had become "The youngest commercial pilot in the United States". So for a few days at least, I had the somewhat dubious and anonymous distinction.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
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  5. Jan 21, 2018 #5

    Don Adamson

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    Took my check ride in Cessna 150, N704UP, at the Reno/Stead Airport on my 17th birthday.
    Got to circle the pylons in N704SQ before the races in 1980.
    Different times, the airport would let us fly RC's off a closed runway.
     
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  6. Jan 21, 2018 #6

    DaleB

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    Late starter here. Always wanted to fly, but eyesight made military aviation out of the question. No pilots in the family; Dad and I flew R/C but he didn't like small planes, and we didn't live near an airport. So... I was 51 when I started flight lessons. Took my checkride at Millard (MLE).

    When I showed up for the exam there was an FAA guy there to check out the DPE. I told him he was welcome to sit in on the oral but he wasn't flying with us that day. No way that 172 would be hauling all three of us up. He was the same one who had ramp checked me in the club plane when I was still a student pilot, so I figured he and I had already filled our quota of official business.
     
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  7. Jan 21, 2018 #7

    cwilliamrose

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    May 10 1970 at TMB and that completed my FAA rating quest. By March 27, 1971 I had worked up enough nerve to land a C-150 at Pitts with actual obstacles (instead of imagined ones) at each end and an actually short runway (compared to TMB anyway).
     
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  8. Jan 21, 2018 #8

    Chris McMillin

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    I took my Private and Commercial the same year, I was 18. I had the longest, most stapled on Student you ever saw. Dad and Joe would sign off multiple cross countries, different airplane check outs and multi engine check outs for solo. That's how I had to get my Private.

    I was pumping gas at Tallmantz, then moved over to Shaw Airmotive because they had a used airplane dealership that was really hopping so I went there to try to fly more. I started ferrying the airplanes around and no one ever asked me for a license. One day I'd been flying some twins, you know... like a 680FP and a 320, and the 135 boss asked me into the office. He said as long as I'm flying for the sales department why don't I get on the 135 certificate? He asks me for my certificates because they didn't have them at the sales office either and I just innocently went to the car and came back with my Texaco logbook with Student/Medical with stapled sheets and sign offs and he about had a conniption fit!

    I explained how I would read the manuals when we went to get the airplanes, or when they came into the airport, write up the normal, emergency, power setting, W&B, etc onto 4x6 cards and that would be my oral for dad to give me, then he'd sign me off. I can't remember his name but he really started to be a good guy to me because he understood the old fashioned-ness of how my old man was, but figured we shouldn't spread it around.

    I called dad and said I had to get my check rides, so we scheduled them and I got my Private in a psychedelic orange 150 N7977F at Fullerton with Abe Pastor. No drama, except Abe liked to do the engine cut with the mixture!

    About 3 weeks later I got my Commercial in my parents R-182 N756MC, out of SNA. I don't remember the man's name but he was an FAA guy and I remember him asking me about the slowest controllable airspeed at the end of the ride, so I set it up and demonstrated that we were right at it after it stalled a little and I recovered and held it stable at that speed, horn howling and I was getting tired. He said, "Okay Chris, what is the speed if we bank the airplane?" Of course he was expecting to hear me say little bit faster, or it'll be increased slightly, or something that simple, but... I just rolled it over into a 30 degree bank and as it shuddered and shook I just fed the power and rudder to it and I said, "How's that?". He said fine, and told me to clean it up and head back to the airport. I was so happy I was done it never dawned on me he was thinking of busting me, so I wheeled into the pattern without a care, set it up for a full flap landing and rolled it on nose high, turned off and taxied back. He then told me to put it away and meet him inside.
    During our debrief, he explained he was worried about me when I didn't seem to understand his minimum control speed question. I then told him I bet that was the dumbest thing he'd ever seen because all I would've had to do was tell him, 'a little bit faster'... and he laughed and told me he was impressed at my rudder skills and that I seemed very comfortable about flying the airplane and made a nice approach and landing, so he though it might've been check-ride-itis or fatigue, and then signed me off.

    I never got my multi, instrument or get on the 135 certificate when I worked at Shaw Airmotive, but I did ferry some more twins because I was "grandfathered" by the 135 boss. Plus no one else knew I didn't have the rating, so...

    Chris...
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2018
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  9. Jan 22, 2018 #9

    Dave Baxter

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    1-23-68 Hemet Calif N2651J C-150 no drama, except for me FAA examiner was a C Smith WE- O8 -12, and the rest so they say is history. Dave
     
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  10. Jan 22, 2018 #10

    bigblackmastiff

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    Clarksburg, West Virginia, 1995. I was 17 y.o , PA-28-161. Always want to stop in there one day and thank that examiner for having faith in me. Looking back on it, I had plenty of growing to do. Still learning today.
    Dan
     
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  11. Jan 22, 2018 #11

    race38

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    Fast forward from ‘79 to ‘90. Had quit flying to chase girls, play music and play with cars, not all in that order. Got married and started the first of my business’. My dad had picked up a pre-war Tcart with a mighty Lyc 145 on the nose. Offered me a ride and let me fly. I did the whole enchilada, and as we were taxiing back, “Get out of my airplane, anybody who hasn’t been up for 5 years and can fly an airplane like that needs to get the license.” Flew that airplane for prolly 200hrs. Went on to get the 108-3 ready and took it for my checkride at W00 with Ed Cressup. I got a more intense checkride when I needed a checkout in a 150 for my cross country. Ed looked at the Stinson and asked if it was ok being so old. I told it flew better than them other spam cans. The wind was howling and cross at W00 and I wheeled it on and got a complimented on it. The thing I remember most was his handshake and the comment “you now have a license to learn”.
    Great day.
     
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  12. Jan 22, 2018 #12

    Neil

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    Private check ride at Farmerville, LA with Glen Barron March 1983
     
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  13. Jan 22, 2018 #13

    RickRice

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    Jonesboro, AR (KJBR) during my first year at college. I probably had 300 hours. As I described in an earlier post, I soloed at 15, but I had to go to college to have access to an airplane that had comm and nav radios. I’d flown a bunch of old airplanes by that time and I owned an Aeronca 65-TL/Defender, but we NEVER had anything with radios. I was working as a lineman at the airport in Jonesboro and that gave me accesss to a discounted price on a C-150. I swapped hours with the FBO’s CFI’s, meaning I’d give them tailwheel dual in the Knocker, and they’d give me free dual in the Cessna, teaching me how to talk on the radio and use OMNI for navigation.

    I took my checkride in one of the FBO’s 150’s and the examiner was the FBO’s 141-school examiner. There was a big crowd waiting when we taxied up to the pumps after the ride, and someone asked him how I did. I’ll never forget what he said; “Starts great, taxis well, everything else needs work!” I was devastated; then he started laughing, and said I’d done great.

    Before I took the checkride, I’d flown in the Knocker with one of the CFI’s to a little fly-in in Heber Springs, AR. While I was there, I met and visited with Tommy Hancock, an FAA fellow from the GADO office in Little Rock that had worked for my dad as an ag pilot before he crossed over to the dark side. I let the CFI take off and he lost it. I recovered, but not before we ran off the runway and took out a runway light. The airplane wasn’t hurt, so I just got back on the runway, poured the coals to it (all 65 coals!) and took off. When we got back to Jonesboro, I had a message that I need to call Mr. Hancock the next morning at his office. I was scared to death. — When I called him, he asked me what happened, so I told him. He then asked to talk to the CFI who was standing with me when I placed the call. He proceeded to give him a royal butt chewing and then asked to talk to me again. After hearing the conversation with the instructor, I thought I was going to get crucified. Turns out he just said, “Ricky, your daddy taught you better than that. Don’t you EVER let anyone take the controls again when you’re not on them with them until you know for sure they’re able to handle the airplane. That damn fool nearly tore your airplane up and if he had, I’d have had to deal with him while Dick dealt with you!” That was all he said to me, but he tore the poor CFI up, telling him that he wasn’t going to violate him because he didn’t want to do the paperwork, but that if he ever caught him “giving dual” in taildraggers again, without first being qualified in the airplane himself, he’d never want to get close to an airplane again!!
     
  14. Jan 22, 2018 #14

    EAABipe40FF

    EAABipe40FF

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    Add how long did your PP check ride and oral exam take? Mine back in 1971 couldn't have taken more than a couple hours total. He had me do a W&B & plan a 50 mile flight. I filed, we got in the airplane, flew to my first check point, canceled the flight plan, did a little air work, put on the hood....flew back and as I said before he landed the airplane, that was it.

    I've heard of more recent horror stories of two day flight tests, several hours on the ground and more in the air. I realize one needs to know somewhat more today but it's nuts IMO. Back then the check pilots seemed to know & trust the local CFI's and trusted that they wouldn't sign off people unless they were ready.

    Maybe it's now lawyer driven? They worry that if the new pilot buys the farm that they will come after their farm......

    Oh well

    Jack
     
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  15. Jan 22, 2018 #15

    Uhoh

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    24 December 1992 in Peoria IL with Mac and Jean. C-150 N2BF

    Craig Munter, my instructor, told me the only reason I passed the test that day was because it was Christmas.
     
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  16. Jan 22, 2018 #16

    smizo

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    May 1998 C-150 N6011G checkride at Blairstown NJ, Bill Standing
     
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  17. Jan 22, 2018 #17

    cwilliamrose

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    My check ride was 55 minutes, I don't recall how long the oral took.
     
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  18. Jan 22, 2018 #18

    cwspilot

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    Private Pilot check ride in ASK-13 KADG 1980 age 16 by a former WWII Luftwaffe pilot. Interesting check ride for sure.
    ASEL add-on 1997 KRMY Maule MX7-180 by a fella that was also an Army Reserve check pilot. He just finished a particularly bad flight review with a crew and I was next. He was all decked out in his flight suit, etc.
    I passed, but felt like I was in the military at the time. lol We got into it a little regarding hypoxia/hypoxemia, etc. I was a current ICU/ER nurse and former respiratory therapist. Convinced him finally that he misunderstood the terms. Also, popped his balloon when got me "lost" while under the hood. Asked me to tell him where we were. I dutifully started to tune in my dual VOR's and while aviating, looked out the window and saw a barn with the town name on roof. Cross checked some land marks and said were right here! "How can you be so certain?" I said because it says so on that barn and there is the town on the chart. He frowned and still made me do the VOR cross check. lol
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2018
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  19. Jan 22, 2018 #19

    Larry Lyons

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    As an aside my check ride was with a woman as old as me and had started out skydiving with some of the same people I knew. After the session under the hood she said, ok where are we and take me home. I turned to a heading that I knew would get us there, told her what I was doing and did some VOR checking as I picked out a target on the horizon and declared, that's home. The winds were 10 gusting to 18 when I launched that morning to fly to Lake in the Hills, 3CK, and were 18 gusting to 27 when her and I landed. She complimented me on completing the flight as she had to take the controls on a check ride just the week before due to strong cross winds. As a matter of fact she tried to talk me out of the flight that morning before I left the house. I insisted because I knew I could handle the wind. I had been practicing in stiff cross winds for weeks in preparation and knew that my screwing up my maneuvers and altitude hold would be almost impossible to separate from the turbulence. Worked like a charm! One of the perks of owning the plane your flying/practicing in is I could do more, when I wanted to.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
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  20. Jan 22, 2018 #20

    Dennis5678

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    Mine was December 4th, 1968 at Herlong Airport in Jacksonville Fla.
    The examiner did a trick on me. He didn't close his door and on take off it popped open. I thought right there I flunked. But I didn't, he did it to see what I would do. Panic or just keep flying the Cessna 150 to a safe alitude and closed it. That is what I did because there was no danger flying with the door cracked open. Always keep flying the aeroplane flying and don't let distractions kill you.
     
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