Which way is up

Discussion in 'Skybolt Wings' started by camwebb777, Dec 9, 2017.

  1. Dec 9, 2017 #1

    camwebb777

    camwebb777

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    Is it on the right way? The trailing edges are not symmetrical with one side marginally shorter than the other. Does the top take the longer edge? This pic is the lower right wing.

    View attachment IMG_1809.jpg
     
  2. Dec 9, 2017 #2

    taff

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    I installed mine the way you have placed the trailing edge, long side on top.

    I don't think it matters.
    I think it's that shape only because of the tooling used to form the piece.
     
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  3. Dec 9, 2017 #3

    raymoeller

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    I mounted mine the same way... you're going to flatten the area where it contacts the rib capstrips anyway so I think it matters not.
     
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  4. Dec 9, 2017 #4

    Dave Baxter

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    As a guy that has made, bent up a lot of trailing edges or had others do it back in the day, I can tell that unless you are very careful and use a press brake with accurate stops, one side or the other will end up exactly like the trailing edges in your picture. Honest. Dave
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2017
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  5. Dec 9, 2017 #5

    Dennis5678

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    I still say that laminated wood T.E. Are better than alum.
     
  6. Dec 10, 2017 #6

    IanJ

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    In what ways are they better, Dennis? Honest question, I'll have to figure out trailing edges relatively soon, and I don't know the pros and cons yet.
     
  7. Dec 10, 2017 #7

    jrs14855

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    From the late great Johnny Carson, after riding with Art Scholl doing a full airshow sequence in the Chipmunk: "I would have thrown up but I didn't know which way up was".
    Trivia: Johnny, Skitch Henderson and Ed McMahon(sp) were all pilots. A friend of mine from Syracuse NY area taught Johnny to fly at Teterborto, NJ when Johnny's show was based in NY.
     
  8. Dec 10, 2017 #8

    cwilliamrose

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    My take on the question is that given a sufficient bump an aluminum TE will bend but may not need immediate attention. A similar bump on a wood TE may result in a broken TE or even a broken rib or two and that would require immediate attention. I would expect the wood TE to be heavier and more difficult to fabricate.
     
  9. Dec 10, 2017 #9

    Dennis5678

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    The wooden T.E. Is stronger and does not add that much weight.
    You say a bumb would break the wooden one. Well if you take that same force of a bump just imagine what it would do to an alum one. Much worse I would guess.
    The force of the bump has everything to do with it. A minor bumb would bend the alum T.E. and would do nothing to the wooden one. On the alum one if you did not seat the rib correctly you will get the alum one becoming loose and fabric wrinkles. With the wooden T.E. This will never happen if done right with a notch in the wood to seat the rib and add triangle blocks inside and along the rib and T.E. No need to put 1/16 ply gussets on the top or bottom. Some have done this using the 1/16 gussets on top and bottom and have made it look good.
     
  10. Dec 10, 2017 #10

    cwilliamrose

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    Having witnessed someone giving the TE of a Pitts a substantial blow with their knee while getting in I can tell I was glad the TE took the hit and nothing else. I was able to massage the bent TE back into a nearly straight condition and it stayed that way for years with almost nobody noticing the damage. No surgery required. Stronger is not always better.
     
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  11. Dec 11, 2017 #11

    jrs14855

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    Stock aluminum trailing edge will stay straight for the life of the fabric, in my case 11 years plus. The wood is prone to warping. If the alum trailing edge is damaged I can do a fix with a pop riveted doubler and some duct tape that will last 10 years if you don't mind ugly.
     
  12. Dec 11, 2017 #12

    EAABipe40FF

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    "Stronger is not always better."

    DITTO !!
     
  13. Dec 13, 2017 #13

    Dennis5678

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    Heck why don't we just use cable for the T.E. Nice WWI effect Lol!
    Oh by the way where do you put the drain holes in alum T.E.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2017
  14. Dec 13, 2017 #14

    Larry Lyons

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    Copper tube makes a great WWI trailing edge! :D
     
  15. Dec 13, 2017 #15

    raymoeller

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    Melt a hole in the fabric with a soldering iron as long as you're going thru the base fabric and a tape, or put a drain grommet on it. Where do you put the hole in a wooden one?
     
  16. Dec 13, 2017 #16

    smizo

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    I can attest that a “substantial bump” will not damage a wooden TE, and clear coat buffs right out.... Mine is spruce between the ribs with a 1/16 ply cap running span wide over the entire wing. In my case it would have been a destroyed aluminum TE. Aluminum is lighter though.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2017
  17. Dec 13, 2017 #17

    Morphewb

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    I don't think I've ever owned anything with a wooden TE unless of course it was something with a wood wing and ply covering.

    There seem to be several different aluminum TE styles but I don't know much now of what's available and what would be suitable for different types of aircraft. Dusters and Sprayers sold the closed triangle TE I believe. I got some from Wicks years ago and it wasn't worth throwing away. Bought some parts lately that had some recent TE from Wicks and it was totally different from the stuff they sold years ago

    I guess the biggest problem is bedding the ribs into the TE to keep them from drawing up but there are different techniques people use for this.

    I'd like to know what technique and style people are using currently.
     
  18. Dec 13, 2017 #18

    smizo

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    I use aluminum TE now from dusters and sprayers. very high quality stuff and stiff! fit to the ribs, blob up inside the TE with epoxy resin and flox so its like putty and smoosh it on. once its set up, drill and install small soft rivet using a flat set on both sides....... the epoxy hardens around the rib and keeps it from pulling in the future with fabric tension.
     
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  19. Dec 13, 2017 #19

    Dennis5678

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    Ref to the drain hole in alum T.E. You just can't just get the lowest point if you put the
    hole ahead of the Alum T.E. I guess you would have to drill a hole in the alum to get to the lowest point. You say well the alum has a bent up flange to keep any water from getting into the inside of the alum T.E. But what about where the rib is and that lip has been flatten? One a wooden T.E. The fabric stops because it is glued at the wood and that is where you put the hole.
    Now do you use regular grommet or a seaplane one. I go for the sea plane ones on the bottom wings and bottom of the fuselage and tail feathers and bottom of the rudder and tail post. Because splashing through a water puddle water can not splash into the hole.
     
  20. Dec 15, 2017 #20

    Lotahp1

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    Why not do as Smizo describes for install (epoxy with flox add to thicken epoxy and A rivets through the trailing edge and through rib). But also use some light weight foam between the ribs. Filling the trailing edge. I’d think even Hardware store squirt foam would work. Just by adding the foam...that weights next to nothing. You would add a incredible amount of rigidity. That’s my plan...unless someone tells me it’s a horrible idea?
     

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