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WTB aircraft plans preferably aerobatic

Holtzy3

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looking to spend about $150 on a new set of plans, can be anything ragwing special, skybolts, <>PITTS!!!!<>, anything that doesn't need a lot of welding and is aerobatic
 

Holtzy3

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aw well i wouldnt mind it i guess but i really dont want to buy sheet metal that ****s just too expensive
 

kbaxter327

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PM your mailing address. I HAVE A FEW OPTIONS FOR YOU.
 

darylat8750

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Like Jerry said. Aircraft quality wood is very expensive. The reason almost all production airplanes were made out of sheet alum. for 50+ years is $. One of the least expensive airplanes you can build is a Thorp T18. If it just had 2 wings.....

One other thing. Don't worry about the cost of plans. Plans cost is a "drop in the bucket" of the overall cost of the build. Find what you want to build. If you go with the Pitts, get all versions of the plans that are available. Also, it would be worth your while to send Beej the money for his Skybolt builders manual. Many tips and pictures there that will help you build any airplane.
 
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Holtzy3

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I see what your saying but i find that alost of aircraft require huge 4'x12' sheets and those comeout to about 700-800$ and none the less i cant weld. Id build a plane if its a rivet structure i just dont want to buy premium size sheet metal.
 

cwilliamrose

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None of us here could weld until we learned and practiced the skill. My hands are not as steady as they once were, the eyes struggle a bit now but I can still do pretty good looking welds. I'd at least try to learn welding so you have more options -- you're going to be spend lots of time and money on your project so don't let one missing skill limit your choices.
 

Holtzy3

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True but how much does a welder cost, i mean with the gas tank and every thing that must cost over a grand, grand and 1/2 remember im 15 and i dont want to spend large amount of money at one time thats why im doing plans not kits haha
 

cwilliamrose

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I started out with oxy-acetylene and that's how I did all the welding on my first project. Regulators, torch, hoses and leased tanks would be a few hundred dollars. You don't need TIG and don't want MIG. You're going to acquire tools to build any airplane, this is just one of them.
 

Holtzy3

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How much for an electric welder like just something to weld the steel tubing
 

Neil

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One of the best things you could do at this point is to have an experienced tube and fabric builder tutor you a bit with Gas Welding. The other option would be some welding classes at a VO TECH school. If you go the route of a VO TECH make sure they have Gas Welding/Brazing as a course option. Won't do you any good to learn to weld on a pipeline. Another option is the Gas Welding videos from EAA. I hear they are pretty good.

I was about your age when I first picked up a torch. Learn the skill, but be careful.

I bought my first torch set at a Pawn Shop. Still got it.
 
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crankyklingon

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OK you're 15. Here's another way to look at it. Pick the airplane you really want without regard to cost or skills you might not have yet.
Start by building the pieces you can afford now, wing ribs are a great example. You can buy enough material to keep you busy for months for a hundred bucks.
Keep the initial parts small and easy to store and move around for the many life events that will interupt the build process over the years. As you acquire skills and confidence you can tackle the big jobs and someday you will have the plane of your dreams, not a compromise.
Turn off the TV, get off the couch, build something. If it takes 20 years you will still have more than if you spent 20 years watching TV!
 

Jerry

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If your only interest in building is to get an airplane... do yourself a favor and start saving your money and buy one. Otherwise... you'll have parts of an airplane that will be sitting in the "back of a hangar" never to be flown.

There are going to be a lot of tough moments when you're building (read that as learning curves... and we're here to help). If you don't enjoy the building process it's going to be tough to push through those moments. You're going to find that you'll build something two, three, four or more times to get it "right". And you'll find yourself actually happy doing it. And you're going to find that you're building jigs as much as you are building the airplane.

by the way... I didn't know how to weld until a few of the guys on here said give it a try.

I hope to see you start building soon...
 

cwilliamrose

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Neither of these machines are good for aircraft welding, they don't have remote controls for varying the heat, they don't do AC (for aluminum) and I don't think they have a high freq start feature. And while they're cheap they don't include the gas system for TIG welding so that will cost extra.

Learn gas welding now while you're young and poor and the skills will transfer well to TIG later. You'll need a gas rig anyway if you building a tube airplane so let it be your welding rig and your heating rig.

Take Jerry's advice to heart. If you don't want to build and are only doing it as a cheap way to fly it's unlikely you'll ever finish the project. It will be cheaper to save your pennies and buy something flyable.
 

Holtzy3

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I want to build and i want to fly but most aircraft take like 10 years to build i want something that i can fly by the end of high school (3 years) i just dont know what aircraft i want thats my problem
 

TFF1

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No matter what airplane you pick, you have to accept that it takes as long as it takes to build it. There is no guarantee you can build it in 3 years even with the simplest designs. Most adults cant do it.
There is no cheap materials when it comes to building an airplane either. Airplane wood costs just as much as airplane steel which is just as much as airplane aluminum. The physical volume might be different with the materials but the cost amount to do the same job is pretty equal. An aluminum wing spar is going to cost about as much as a wood one.
There are tons of partial projects for sale; a 1/2 built airplane is worth about 1/2 of what was spent on materials. You can take advantage of that situation buying one of these.
There are no airplanes you can make without some type of specialist tools. Good drills and saws for the correct materials. Rivet gun for aluminum with associated tools, welder for steel, nice woodworking tools for wood. You cant get around it; they dont have to be the best, but they do have to be right for the job.
Everybody here wants you be successful and everyone here has had the same dream at 15.
 
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If you are 15 join an EAA chapter and hang out with people building airplanes. Then start looking at airplanes that appeal to you. If you get plans because they were free or cheap that won't do much for you except to read them and study aircraft design. E bay has hundreds of plans scalpers selling discs of all kinds of airplanes and the're cheap.
 

christopher

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"There are tons of partial projects for sale; a 1/2 built airplane is worth about 1/2 of what was spent on materials. You can take advantage of that situation buying one of these."


That's what I did. Knowing what I wanted, I searched until finding my Baby Lakes on Ebay. I got most of the materials for the cost of the tubing. Quality work was done too (i.e. welding). The plans were included, as were wheels/brakes, tailwheel. It doesn't hurt to shop for a while. I personally wanted to do more than 50% of the work, so I passed on one without engine and needing recovered for a little more money. I had also passed on great deals on other kinds of planes because they weren't a Baby Lakes. Best of luck!
 

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