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Firebolt/Skybolt For Sale

Jwilsonphoto

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I'm considering the sale of my Skybolt because I just don't see the possibility of having time to put it back together. Here's the history:

Fuselage and wings professionally built by George Evans and Mac McKenzie, flawless construction. The fuselage is TIG welded, stress relieved and linseed oiled internally. It is the longer, better balanced, later design, with the torque tube and sticks in bearings.. They built it with the cantilevered gear (poor choice) and the reason it is all apart is that I had Steen Aero build me new gear, complete with truss, fittings, etc, then had American Legend aircraft jig the fuselage up and replace the cantilevered gear with the updated longer Skybolt gear. The fuselage and wings are covered and painted, but I would imagine whoever buys it would want to do that in their paint scheme. The tail signature is the more contoured Firebolt design, with the aerodynamically balanced rudder/elevators.

The wings have all of the latest fittings, but I did not have them built to Firebolt specs due to the ridiculous amount of weight and over engineering. All fittings are primed and painted with white epoxy. The leading edges are perfectly formed aluminum and a center section tank is installed in the top wing. All the woodwork is protected with T-88 Epoxy. Tip bows are formed for nav lights and strobes and there's a Whelen three point system with the airplane.

Firewall Forward: Dyna-Focal Mount/Aerobatic Lord Mounts. IO-360 with the sump modified for a Christen Inverted System. Chrome Rocker Covers, Cermichrome Cylinders, balanced and blueprinted in a certificated overhaul, Slick Shower of Sparks Magnetos. Four into One Tuned Exhaust with a ceramic coating. 231 hrs. TT Logs for engine & Prop.

Hartzell HCC2YK Propeller with 231 hrs. TT (Inspection Required)

So:

Latest Skybolt Main Fuel Tank
Cleveland 6:00 x 6 Wheels and Brakes
6:00 x 6 Goodyear Flight Custom Tires
Scott HD Tailwheel/New Tire
Stainless Steel Firewall/McKenzie/Evans
ELT
KT-76 Transponder
King Comm
Transcal Encoder
Dual Throttle Quadrants
MacWhyte Flying/Landing and Tail Brace Wires
Front and Rear Instrument Panels with Instruments, including EI Digital CHT/EGT
Cowling/Coaming/Windshields/Firebolt Split Nose Bowl

Fuselage is on a custom built, powder coated rolling steel rack that adjust height and will rotate the fuselage to any angle.

I would sell this as an uncertified Skybolt and I'm keeping my N Number.

$26,000 Photos to follow.
 

inverted25

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Selling it uncertified will create issues for the buyer. Correct me if I'm wrong. At that point without a build log etc they would never be able to get it certified again
 

EAABipe40FF

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"Certified"? No way it is certified. I assume what is meant is no AWC has been issued? It can't ne issued until it's finished/ready to fly. I also assume build logs and records are included, it not it's nothing but a pile of parts?
 

inverted25

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"Certified"? No way it is certified. I assume what is meant is no AWC has been issued? It can't ne issued until it's finished/ready to fly. I also assume build logs and records are included, it not it's nothing but a pile of parts?

He said put it back together so I assumed it was flying at one time
 

Jwilsonphoto

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Good Afternoon Guys,

Sorry, you bring up a good point. This is a great airplane project for someone, just not me at this stage of my life. My goal is to limit liability if I sell it. I guess really given the fact that it is completely apart and the main components are professionally built, I don't have any liability to speak of, but I'm very sensitive to that issue.

I have the builder's log, the airframe, engine and prop logs. As I said, I will put my N Number on another aircraft at some point so I want that back.

More images to follow.

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zx6rrider

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This situation had me a bit curious so I looked into it a little. Seems like the easiest way to transfer this for the next buyer would be to sell it with the previous airworthiness certificate and operating limitations. The gear would be considered a major alteration and require notification of the FAA and possibly more flight test. The N-number should be a minor issue; you could even give it a new number prior to selling it so you can keep yours. I cant imagine you would have any liability once some else puts it all together and has a condition inspection signed off. Take pictures of it leaving on a truck

As far as selling it as a project without the airworthiness certificate, the next owner may have a hard time convincing the inspector they "built" it.

I don't mean to tell you what to do but thought I would share what I found as I dream..... right now I'm a bit 182 poor. Good luck with the sale
 

Lotahp1

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This is a great deal for someone. But yes, request a change of N number for this one, request a hold on its current number (for a future plane of yours...I believe it's a yearly $10 fee) and sell the plane with the current airworthiness. EAA offers a outstanding bill of sale that is designed by lawyers to help in this exact manner. Please do not make this harder than needed for he aircraft to continue to fly. If I was looking for a Skybolt...wow, new cover , 250hrs (ish) on engine and prop, for mid twenties? Deal of the moment, someone should jump on!
 

Jwilsonphoto

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Thanks Guys! I appreciate your insights. I added a couple more images that I took yesterday. The fuselage is in East Texas at a race car builders shop having floorboards made. He's the one that built my fuselage stand too, which is a work of art in itself . This truly is a wonderful project and it was a dream to fly. I'm a commercial photographer/cinematographer who specializes in aviation and I've done too good a job marketing my services, there just is no time for this and I'm tired of walking by it and feeling badly.

182 poor is a great place to be, wonderful aircraft!

Yes, some time and a few grand in this airplane and someone will have a beautiful Skybolt to fly.
 
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Nate

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Good luck, sounds like a great buy for someone. Forgive my ignorance but in your initial description you mentioned "The fuselage is TIG welded, stress relieved and linseed oiled internally."

What exactly is stress relief, I know what the term means but what are you referring to? Also is it good to put linseed oil inside the tubes, what exactly this is do?
 

gmann750

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Good luck, sounds like a great buy for someone. Forgive my ignorance but in your initial description you mentioned "The fuselage is TIG welded, stress relieved and linseed oiled internally."

What exactly is stress relief, I know what the term means but what are you referring to? Also is it good to put linseed oil inside the tubes, what exactly this is do?
Linseed oil helps prevent corrosion
 

EAABipe40FF

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It is thought by some that tig welding introduces stress in 4130 especially in clusters. So a Ox-Ac torch is used to heat the cluster above critical temp. and slowly removed thereby relieving the stress. Some factories did this when they first went to Tig and similar methods. The concept may be true but it has been found to probably be unnecessary in practice at least in controlled factory settings.

Maybe?

Jack
 
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Nate

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Thanks for the explanation
 

Nate

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Would there be problems later on if one does not use linseed oil inside the tubes?
 

ndlakesdreamer

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Would there be problems later on if one does not use linseed oil inside the tubes?
IF there were pinholes in a weld then air could enter and cause condensation inside the tube. This can lead to rust through from the inside. I've seen it on certificated tube frame airplanes. If you can rinsing the frame with linseed oil is a good prevention.
 

Nate

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IF there were pinholes in a weld then air could enter and cause condensation inside the tube. This can lead to rust through from the inside. I've seen it on certificated tube frame airplanes. If you can rinsing the frame with linseed oil is a good prevention.
What about longerons that were just capped after 15 years? I assume there has been plenty of condensation happening.
 

ndlakesdreamer

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What about longerons that were just capped after 15 years? I assume there has been plenty of condensation happening.
I wouldn't worry as much if they were open, any condensation could run out in that case. It's mostly a concern when it collects and stays in the tubes.
 

Morphewb

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Don't over think this too much. When the Cubs, Tri Pacers, Champs, T crafts were getting their first major rebuilds in the 60's and 70's most of the tubing rust was from the outside in instead of the inside out. Almost ALL of these airplanes spent the first 20 years of their lives living in a tie down spot in all kinds of weather with little thought of internal or external rust. Even the strut problems had a lot to do with how those airplanes were treated all those years before people started coveting them and treating them better.

Even that EAA Biplane in another topic probably has pristine internal tubing condition just because it's obviously been hangared for how ever long it's been around. Good bet there isn't one drop of internal corrosion proofing inside the fuselage and no rust either. A longeron can rust even with internal treatment. I've seen it and I know others on here have too. I certainly wouldn't turn down an airplane if it weren't internally treated but I'd want to poke around in the suspected spots as anyone should do on any good pre buy inspection.
 

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