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DIY hose clamps

Randy

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Anyone have any thoughts on using this tool to make hose clamps using safety wire? The Oshkosh demo looked good. Clamptitetools.com

Screen Shot 2017-08-13 at 2.40.17 PM.jpg
 

cwilliamrose

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Looks like it takes a lot of room to create the clamps and would be of limited use for that reason. We used safety wire a lot for making hose clamps on ultralights and similar airplanes but the termination was always done with safety wire pliers.
 

Morphewb

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That's one of those relatively useless OSH purchases that seems like a good idea at the time. The one I bought seven or eight years ago is still in the OSH tool kit...unopened.
 

taff

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Long time ago, I bought one. Tried one, wrestled with one, repeated the wrestle with one and finally gave up on one.

At Osh, they look cool (under demo) so I figured I may have a use.
But when I got it home and grabbed my safety wire it was more like a puzzle. And after about a dozen tries I figured that it was not that important of a tool.
 

RickRice

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That tool was invented by a Mr. George Disinger, from Jonesboro, AR back in the days when Curtis OX-5 engines were cheap and plentiful. He was a friend of my dad's, and I have one of the originals in my toolbox. That said, it is pretty useless in this day and age. Mr. George told me he used them several times back in the old days, after blowing a coolant hose on the OX. He said the tolerances were so loose on those engines, that they'd get hot an sieze up after losing the coolant. He said he'd glide in, and by the time he got the hose replaced and refilled the coolant, the engine would be cooled down enough to fire up again, and it would run just fine, without having been damaged from getting overheated. -- While I was in college, he built up a new Travel Air 2000 and hung an OX on it. Daddy did the test flights on it, and then he flew it a few times with Mr. George, and then it got parked. I worked on it many afternoons after I got off work in the maintenance shop, but I never got to fly it. After he flew it with Daddy, he realized he never was going to be able to fly by himself again, so he sold the airplane not long after that. -- Back to the tool, Mr. George gave me one of his old originals, and I showed it to everyone as I traveled around as as an ag-Chem peddled. Wasn't long after that, there was a company out of Arkansas that was selling them at farm shows. Mr. George filed a patent on them back in the 30's, but I don't think it was ever perfected, but the application is in the records at the USPTO. The early devices from Mr. George were marked Patent Pending, but I think he figured out that the market was small enough that it wasn't worthwhile to finish the patent or to set up and do large scale production. -- Mr. George was one of my dad's airplane mentors, having started in the airplane business in 1924, the year Daddy was born. Daddy wanted to stay in the Air Force after WWII ended, so to get him to come back to the farm, my grandpa bought a Stearman and helped Daddy get started in the crop dusting business. The Stearman was almost brand new, and Daddy didn't yet know anything about aircraft mechanics, so he took it to Mr. George to have the airplane converted into an ag plane, and the relationship between them was born. I grew up knowing Mr. George all through my childhood, but I saw him almost every day throughout college, as he owned the airport where I worked after class. I'd head over to his private shop after I got off work, and I'd stay stay and eat supper with him a couple of times a week. He loved old airplanes, he knew a lot about them from having flown them and fixed them, and I learned a lot from him. I still miss him.
 

Jerry

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That tool was invented by a Mr. George Disinger, from Jonesboro, AR back in the days when Curtis OX-5 engines were cheap and plentiful. He was a friend of my dad's, and I have one of the originals in my toolbox. That said, it is pretty useless in this day and age. Mr. George told me he used them several times back in the old days, after blowing a coolant hose on the OX. He said the tolerances were so loose on those engines, that they'd get hot an sieze up after losing the coolant. He said he'd glide in, and by the time he got the hose replaced and refilled the coolant, the engine would be cooled down enough to fire up again, and it would run just fine, without having been damaged from getting overheated. -- While I was in college, he built up a new Travel Air 2000 and hung an OX on it. Daddy did the test flights on it, and then he flew it a few times with Mr. George, and then it got parked. I worked on it many afternoons after I got off work in the maintenance shop, but I never got to fly it. After he flew it with Daddy, he realized he never was going to be able to fly by himself again, so he sold the airplane not long after that. -- Back to the tool, Mr. George gave me one of his old originals, and I showed it to everyone as I traveled around as as an ag-Chem peddled. Wasn't long after that, there was a company out of Arkansas that was selling them at farm shows. Mr. George filed a patent on them back in the 30's, but I don't think it was ever perfected, but the application is in the records at the USPTO. The early devices from Mr. George were marked Patent Pending, but I think he figured out that the market was small enough that it wasn't worthwhile to finish the patent or to set up and do large scale production. -- Mr. George was one of my dad's airplane mentors, having started in the airplane business in 1924, the year Daddy was born. Daddy wanted to stay in the Air Force after WWII ended, so to get him to come back to the farm, my grandpa bought a Stearman and helped Daddy get started in the crop dusting business. The Stearman was almost brand new, and Daddy didn't yet know anything about aircraft mechanics, so he took it to Mr. George to have the airplane converted into an ag plane, and the relationship between them was born. I grew up knowing Mr. George all through my childhood, but I saw him almost every day throughout college, as he owned the airport where I worked after class. I'd head over to his private shop after I got off work, and I'd stay stay and eat supper with him a couple of times a week. He loved old airplanes, he knew a lot about them from having flown them and fixed them, and I learned a lot from him. I still miss him.
Great story... thanks for sharing.
 

Larry Lyons

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My story is similar, it works and works well but room to operate is almost never available on our modern aircraft. I have used it, more than once, but most of the time it simply won't work in the location I need to use it.
 

DaleB

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My wife insisted I buy one when we saw the demo. That was in Oshkosh in 2014.

Don't think I've ever used it for anything. I was going to, once, but... well... see above.
 

planebuilder

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I saw it at Oshkosh a few years ago and didn't buy it. I regretted it, and bought one the next time I was there. It only gets used occasionally, but I keep it on hand for the few times I need a clamp and don't have one. They clamp very well. One use that I love it for is putting new ends on air lines in the shop. If you use a gear hose clamp, you have a "lump" and often a sharp end that will snag your hand. This tool makes a compact low laying clamp, a wrap of electrical tape over it and won't snag on anything and will last a long time.
You can never have enough tools!!:)
 

crankyklingon

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+1 for the air hose in the shop. Finish it off with heat shrink and it's better than any clamp.
Also better than those stainless bands for securing header wrap. Much less bleeding when you do maintenance around them.
 

taff

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If I were making my own air hose I would consider a three piece air line end, like the one in the photo. DeVilbiss has good ones.
There is a ferule around the air line end that you tighten up against and this make it virtually impossible for it to come apart. They come in male or female threads for the air line connectors.

I don't know if I would chance a barbed fitting held tight with a circular Breeze clamp (Like a repair to a garden water hose). Over time they get loose and could come apart when dropped on the floor, pulled across the floor or tugging on the air tool or when attached to the spray gun. Then it's a mess.

IMG_5836[1].jpg
 

EAABipe40FF

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Would someone post a picture of a clamp made with this tool. I can't quite get my mind wrapped around it?
 

will moffitt

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When I was a kid the old goat next door showed me how to make a wire clamp. Very simple but hard to describe so I won't. Works very well on things like a garden hose and probably even an air hose but not on an airplane.

will
 

Lotahp1

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So the only thing that keeps it from coming loose is the last end over? (Plus the friction of the double wrap)

I saw these at OSH and even stopped. My 10yr old said "come on Daddy...you don't need that"

I figured this was like the "rescue tape". Something cool but rarely used and hardly ever the "correct" fix. Why not just take the time and fix it right vs spending money on something to Jerry Rig it?

BTW how much are there's? Anyone got one for sale ? ;-)
 

EAABipe40FF

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Thanks for the video. I think it's cool and effective. I may make a DIY DIY hose clamp tool.

Jack
 

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