Skybolt three pcs top wing

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by chubb.rc, Jan 13, 2018.

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  1. Jan 13, 2018 #1

    chubb.rc

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    Has anyone done or doing the three pice top wing? What do you think about that is it a good think or a bad or know idea. Please let me know thank you
     
  2. Jan 13, 2018 #2

    Dave Baxter

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    Robert, I think there is a rather long thread on here pertaining to the three piece upper wing on the Skybolt, not sure how to search for it though? Dave
     
  3. Jan 13, 2018 #3

    cactusav8r

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  4. Jan 13, 2018 #4

    chubb.rc

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    Thanks gays I am building in a small shed so I was looking for info. Great to have all of you gays for the info thanks again
     
  5. Jan 14, 2018 #5

    cactusav8r

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    Robert asked for some pics of my two piece wing. I thought I would post here in case anyone else wanted to see.. If it was me, and it's not.. I'm not a builder, I wouldn't go off on my own away from the plans. I can not adjust the wings at all. If they are a note off, they are a note off, perhaps it's just mine. Again I would stick to what ever plans.

    n56bscabanesmall.jpg

    IMG_4498small.jpg

    n56bsupperwingRsmall.jpg

    IMG_4491small.jpg

    n56bsupperwingr1.jpg
     
  6. Jan 14, 2018 #6

    cwilliamrose

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    Why do you say you can't adjust the wings? Seems like you have all the adjustments available that any other Skybolt has.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2018 #7

    cactusav8r

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    Not the way my I Struts meet the wing.. The bracket doesn't allow for it. I struts meet wing and bolt into a bracket that is mounted on the spar. They can't be tweaked...

    I guess it has less to do with being two pieces.
     
  8. Jan 14, 2018 #8

    cwilliamrose

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    I see, unfortunate choice by the builder.
     
  9. Jan 14, 2018 #9

    cactusav8r

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    Here is the thread about my two piece wing.

    http://www.biplaneforum.com/showthread.php?t=11696

    My two piece evidently was designed/engineered by the Builder (an Aeronautical Engineer) with help from a Who's Who of Skybolt designers, including Steen/ Wallace and even McKenzie. According to the Builder it was built for Strength first and truing second. He told me that he knew he wouldn't be able to adjust the wing, but felt like this was the stronger way to do it. My flying wires are also one size thicker than the plans. I am told Thicker is better.. I'm just saying..

    As a non Engineer I wouldn't be painting outside of the lines.. Why not just build the 3 part Wing?
     
  10. Jan 14, 2018 #10

    cactusav8r

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    not really my plane fly's hands off, and I am told that the brackets are what Skybolt went to anyway..
     
  11. Jan 14, 2018 #11

    cwilliamrose

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    Hands off does not necessarily mean properly rigged. Hopefully in your case it is one in the same.
     
  12. Jan 14, 2018 #12

    cactusav8r

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    Well it flys straight and my ailerons/controls are all flush. I did have a slight roll but traced it down to one aileron.
     
  13. Jan 14, 2018 #13

    Randy

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    Not completely sure I am understanding why your wing incidence is not adjustable at the "I" strut. The bracket that is attached to the wing that the "I" strut attaches to is an idea from MacKenzie. He had this 'thing' about drilling a bolt hole through the spar and causing a weak/water entry spot ?

    Anyway, I used it on a couple of the SkyBolts I built. The bracket has a locking platenut rivited on the underside so a very short bolt holds the "I" strut in place. My wings were just as adjustable as anyone else's - just add the washers and use a longer bolt.

    I must be misunderstanding something here as this is way to simple a solution - - - - - ?

    To add another note - One of MacKenzie's 'builders' designed a 2 piece upper wing that was shown in the newsletter in the late 70's (check out the newsletters in "handy Resources") If I remember correctly 1" was cut from the end of each upper spar and the cabanes were lengthened 2-3" to bury them inside the upper wing with access by removal of the fairing covering the 2" opening made when the spars were shortened. I have never seen a SkyBolt built this way so no recommendations but it was a very clean installation. Might find the name of the builder in the newsletters - he might still be on the planet - - hey - - I'm still here :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
  14. Jan 14, 2018 #14

    cactusav8r

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    Mine Slide into a square shaped box attached to a plate on the front of the spar, and a bolt goes through it holding it together.

    I drew it out.. no way to adjust it.

    According to the Builder, the Cessna Engineers that helped him, they said build it straight and he wouldn’t need to adjust it. They didn’t like the planes drilling through the spar. So I guess mine is a sort of Mckenzie adaptation, but not completely.. I don’t have Mckenzie plans.



    View attachment IMG_8611.jpg View attachment IMG_8612.jpg
     
  15. Jan 14, 2018 #15

    cwilliamrose

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    Cessna engineers work with materials more stable than wood.
     
  16. Jan 14, 2018 #16

    cactusav8r

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    So?

    I’m confident in my planes pedigree..

    Evidently they weren’t the only ones that didn’t like drilling a hole in the spar. Seems to me the fewer holes someone drills in ANYTHING the better.

    Cessna engineers built plenty of wood planes.
    Bamboo Bomber comes to mind.
     
  17. Jan 15, 2018 #17

    cwilliamrose

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    My statement was partially in jest. Still, any Cessna engineers who worked on wood structures were likely retired by the time your airplane was built.

    I do find it funny that engineers often fix the designs of others when there is little or no history to indicate a problem exists. I'll bet there are more holes in that area than before the change albeit in different spots.
     
  18. Jan 15, 2018 #18

    cactusav8r

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    Can’t tell “jest” on a website..

    Yea, they probably were retired by then but who knows.

    Peace

    Engineers always try and make something better.. my Dad was one..He was insufferable.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
  19. Jan 15, 2018 #19

    cactusav8r

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    As far as the holes go. 4 small ones from the face to the back in order to sandwich the spar plates in place, none vertically through the spar.

    I’m not an Aeronautical Engineer so I can’t/won’t argue the merits of either. The Builder is.

    As far as the Cessna engineers go, the gentleman than built my plane is one and still works there. He started there in the 70s, so at least 40 years. The 70s were when he built my Skybolt so it would be safe to say there easily could have been old timers there from the days of the Bamboo Bomber but who really knows.

    In any case Steen/Wallace and Mackenzie were all in on the mods that Scotty made. Everyone that sees the insides and flying wires of my plane says about the same thing.. “this thing is built like a double walled brick outhouse”

    My cross to bear isn’t weakness or not being in trim, it’s weight.
     
  20. Jan 16, 2018 #20

    Lotahp1

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    I’ve often wondered why have a one piece upper wing. I always assumed it was for strength if the cabanes weren’t designed like a Stearman or Starduster Too. (Single point in the middle attach vs the cabanes angling away from the fuselage with braces from the top of cabane to the middle of the fuselage). I guess the lost strength of the one piece spar was made up by increasing the flying/landing wire size. Interesting. There’s always multiple ways to get somewhere...
     
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