Applying NC #s

Discussion in 'Fabric & Paint' started by bigblackmastiff, Jun 11, 2017.

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  1. Jun 11, 2017 #1

    bigblackmastiff

    bigblackmastiff

    bigblackmastiff

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    I'll be painting the NC # on the Waco soon. I'm planning to use Ranthane. I'm just wondering if there is a better way than masking it all off. I'm wondering if anyone has had a vinyl stencil made? Would it be safe to put it on new paint? No interest in vinyl letters btw.
    Thanks, Dan.

    IMG_0533.JPG
     
  2. Jun 11, 2017 #2

    hosspowerinc

    hosspowerinc

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    A vinyl stencil is the way to go. They make special masking vinyl but there is no problem using regular vinyl if the sign shop doesn't have it. One tip is to cut the letters apart and put them on one at a time. Put some reference marks on each side of the cut so it's easy to keep things in line. I've done this on a dozen or so airplanes and most people think it's vinyl the results are so good.
     
  3. Jun 11, 2017 #3

    bigblackmastiff

    bigblackmastiff

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    Thanks.
    Any idea how long the Ranthane needs before applying the vinyl or tape?
     
  4. Jun 11, 2017 #4

    will moffitt

    will moffitt

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    I think ACS sells the stencil

    will
     
  5. Jun 11, 2017 #5

    hosspowerinc

    hosspowerinc

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    Ranthane seems to stay softer longer when compared to Aerothane but two days is usually our minimum. I'd wait longer if it's an option.
     
  6. Jun 11, 2017 #6

    bigblackmastiff

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    Yes, I'll wait as long as I need. I'm looking ahead. For now two wings are up to base coat white, 3rd ready for silver, 4th on deck.
     
  7. Jun 11, 2017 #7

    Don Adamson

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    2 days before taping works well for Ranthane.
    Most sign shops can only do less than 24" height due to the size of their plotter and material. Have them cut vertically if you are recutting for spacing anyway.
     
  8. Jun 12, 2017 #8

    airplanegeek

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    Have an aviation specific shop do the paint mask. Aero graphics or Moody. Your local shop won't get authentic Fonts we use in aviation.

    I would call Aerographis first and talk to Marilyn
     
  9. Jun 12, 2017 #9

    cleko

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    I used Aerographics stencils on a Citabria I restored. They are quality and can be applied without separating them if a drop of soap in water is used with a spray mist. I would let the paint harden before applying the stencil; however, after it hardens scuffing will be required before the overspray with Ranthane will adhere. Ask me how I know - I got it right on the second attempt. It is difficult the scuff up to the edge of the stencil but it is necessary for the edges of to adhere.

    Ken
     
  10. Jun 12, 2017 #10

    Dennis5678

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    What age is the cut off for using the NC instead of just the N ?
     
  11. Jun 13, 2018 at 8:47 PM #11

    bigblackmastiff

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    Well, I fired that Big shop today. After a month and a half, and one sloppy proof, and several "sorry about the delay" emails, I went to the local sign makers. They printed the Large and Small Registration #'s while I waited. The cost was not quite a third of the recommended shop. The tapered striping will be ready in a week due to ordering more masking vinyl.
     
  12. Jun 14, 2018 at 2:30 PM #12

    cashflyer

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    From wikipedia:

    An older aircraft (registered before 31 December 1948) may have a second letter in its identifier, identifying the category of aircraft. This additional letter is not actually part of the aircraft identification (e.g. NC12345 is the same registration as N12345). Aircraft category letters have not been included on any registration numbers issued since 1 January 1949, but they still appear on antique aircraft for authenticity purposes. The categories were:


    • C = airline, commercial and private
    • G = glider
    • L = limited
    • R = restricted
    • S = state
    • X = experimental

    For the "C", I have seen some sources indicate that the "C" indicated "certified".
    I don't think "airline" would be correct.
     
  13. Jun 14, 2018 at 2:37 PM #13

    cashflyer

    cashflyer

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    Further info about the airworthiness category letter, from the FAA's website:

    No mention of N numbers appeared in the initial Air Commerce Regulations placed in effect by FAA's first predecessor agency in December 1926. The letter markings that this original set of rules specified were C (commercial), S (state), and P (private), which were to precede the numbers assigned to licensed aircraft. Unlicensed aircraft had numbers, but no letters, at this time.

    The earliest legal requirement for the N marking is found in the first general amendments to the Air Commerce Regulations on March 22,1927. These amendments mandated that U.S. aircraft engaged in foreign air commerce display the N at the beginning of its identification markings. Later, this requirement was extended to all U.S. aircraft, regardless of whether they operated beyond the Nation's borders.

    A second letter indicating the aircraft's airworthiness category followed the N and preceded the identification numbers. These airworthiness indicators were; "C" for standad, "R" for restricted, "X" for experimental, and later an "L" for limited, (for example, NC1234). This was standard until December 31, 1948, when aircraft registered for the first time were required to display identification marks consisting of only the Roman capital letter "N" followed by the registration number. Existing aircraft operated solely within the United States could continue to display an airworthiness symbol until the first time such aircraft were recovered or refinished to an extent necessitating the reapplication of the identification marks. After December 31, 1950, all aircraft of United States registry operated outside of the United States were required to display identification marks consisting of the Roman capital letter "N" followed by the registration number.



    So there you go - the "C" originally stood for "Commercial", and then later indicated "standard" airworthiness.


    ref: https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certif...n/aircraft_registry/aircraft_nnumber_history/
     
  14. Jun 14, 2018 at 5:25 PM #14

    kjkimball

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    My understanding is "c" stands for Civil which includes airline, commercial and private registered aircraft. At that time, the FAA was the CAA, Civil Aviation Authority.

    Back to the subject, I always layout N Numbers or US ARMY or NAVY lettering that is 6" tall or greater. I have made a few layout tools for the various size letters that makes it go really fast and I can compensate for fabric scalloping or tapered surfaces much easier that a giant mask. I own a vinyl cutter that can cut 48" wide material and I use it often for complex scheme layouts and masks. But not for 24" N numbers.
     
  15. Jun 14, 2018 at 6:03 PM #15

    jrs14855

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    NX is commonly used on EAB and allows deletion of the Experimental placards. I question the March 1927 date for N numbers. Spirit of St Louis had an n number??
     
  16. Jun 14, 2018 at 8:22 PM #16

    TFF1

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    N-X-211
     

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