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New Russian welding torch and full tip set

fidot

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I got a Russian welding torch, perfect for typical kind of welding we do here. New, not used except for me testing it to make sure all tips are clean.

$100 plus whatever it costs me to ship it to you gets it.

Currently unavailable - taking pre-orders! I should have a few more in January; but I can make sure I have one set aside for you. No prepayment necessary of course :).

Basics.

This is an injector (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxy-fuel_welding_and_cutting#Injector_torch) type oxyfuel welding torch made in Russia. I've used it with acetylene and hydrogen (for aluminum welding). I like it much better than "standard" small torches, Meco Midget included.

It offers a steady flame and, unlike typical Smith or Harris torches, oxygen adjustment is very accurate (oxygen pressure in this torch is at minimum 20 PSI as compared to around 3-5 PSI for a "regular" torch).

The torch is very light, weighting 11 ounces without hose (including bibs).

Supported material thickness range is 0.008 - 0.157 inches.

What's included

  • Torch Handle
  • Injector Torch Tips sizes 0, 1, 2, 3
  • 2 hose bib flares with nuts for 1/4 ID hose
  • Original manual with stamps in Russian
  • My translation of critical parts of the manual (pressures, tip sizes, specs)
  • Drawing of an attachment flare, dimensioned in inches, for 1/8 ID hose

But it's metric?

Yes it is. However, the bibs will readily accept 1/4 ID hose (and maybe even 3/16 ID hose, I haven't tried that).

The nuts on the fittings are M12x1.25. Left thread for fuel, just like in the U.S. made torches.

If you need to put a smaller hose on it, one option is to custom make flared bibs; I will include the drawing with dimensions for 1/8 ID Smith Kevlar brazing hose I use (and please feel free to contact me for a bigger drawing or an original SolidWorks model file, if you use that). I asked Bill Rose to make some for me, and the last picture in the listing shows the bibs he made on the Smith hose. They're not included with the torch Im selling!

Another option is to use the bibs off of your hoses, cut them off, cut the included bibs, and use some JB Weld magic to put the two together. Joe Maj, of Oshkosh and SportAir welding workshop fame, who originally introduced me to these torches did just that with considerable success.

Some more notes

When I bought it, it came in a box with all the components loose in it. Apparently Russians haven't discovered bubble wrap just yet. This caused some minor scuff marks on the torch. Look at the pictures -- you will see them, mostly on valves. This is of no significance. The torch hasn't been used in any welding aside from testing the tips and running one test bead about 1/2 inch long with each one of them.

This is an injector type torch, and therefore it will require a lot of oxygen pressure. I was able to run #1 tip with around 25 PSI (I set pressures with torch running, just a touch above what I need for work with that tip, whatever it is). The torch will be louder than your typical torch.

Looks like tips are die cast and coated with copper. They will white after doing some "hot" welds (T-joints and such). That's of no problem.

If a tip gunks up too much and starts splitting flame, run a tip cleaner thru it. If that doesn't help, usually an accordingly sized drill bit, sometimes a touch undersized, chucked in a Dremel type tool, will clean it real well.

Notes on setting pressures

I use this sequence when setting pressures on any torch; it takes any regulator discrepancies out of the picture, and provides just the right amount of pressure to the torch.

  • Remember, the main job of a regulator is to "smooth" out the cylinder pressure (it starts high and drops as you use the gas)
  • Remember, the final "pressure" authority is your torch valves
  • My philosophy: regulator should deliver the *right* amount of gas to the torch plus some for "padding", the actual PSI number is largely irrelevant.
  • Note: repeat after changing the tip. Remember, tip changes the amount of pressure the torch needs.
  • Modification for lazy people: set pressures this way for the largest tip you use. You will be able to run any tip size under largest one, but your "control" granurality with torch valves will be reduced.

The idea behind this method is that if your max PSI delivered into the torch that you need for this particular setup will be with the valve fully open. Therefore, you have the full range of valve settings in between "open" and "closed" to adjust.

If you have too much pressure, your max PSI for the tip will be at torch valve's "somewhat" open position, and the range of valve positions available for fine tuning the flame will be reduced; and therefore, control granularity you will have will be reduced as well.

  1. Start with regulators all closed up and delivering 0 on both fuel and oxy. Torch valves closed.
  2. Open the fuel valve fully.
  3. Crank the regulator somewhat to get the gas flowing. Light it up. Ill assume you're using acetylene (for the sake technique of determining how much's too much).
  4. Your flame will be sooty most likely. Keep cranking the regulator until you get rid of the soot. No soot? Regulator open too much, close it up. "Find the soot - loose the soot". After you found the sweet spot, crank the regulator a touch more -- up to the point where the flame starts detaching from the tip. Stop. That's all you need.
  5. Close the torch fuel valve up to re-attach the flame back to the tip. No soot. That's the right amount of fuel for this tip.
  6. Open up the oxygen valve completely (your regulator is still at 0, right?)
  7. Add oxygen by cranking the regulator up. Get to the neutral flame.
  8. Now, open up the acetylene valve on the torch fully. That will make the flame oxygen-deprived (carburizing), you will see the feather. Crank the oxygen regulator up to get rid of the feather and get a neutral.
  9. Done. Close the oxygen valve on the torch. Shut off acetylene.


Questions? Let me know.

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culver10

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Can we see a picture with it next to a tape measure or ruler? :)
 

fidot

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Yes! Damn, sorry, I should've thought of that myself. Ill post that later tonite.

The handle is about 6 inches, and with the tip #1 it feels like a bit under 12 inches long.

It's roughly the same size as your typical Harris; with the exception of two things.

Valves are double the diameter (large, about 1 inch in diameter).
The handle itself is beefy (though light); very nice feel in your hand.. kinda like a medium size hammer.
 

smizo

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I don't think the Russians made anything that wasn't beefy!
 

Larry Lyons

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I don't think the Russians made anything that wasn't beefy!
But mark my words it worked. Maybe not elegant but sufficient for the job. We had little idea during the cold war build up, but for every pane we put in the air they were able to put up 25 to a 100. Sure as hell glad we never had to prove which ideology was better. Look at Viet Nam Ho Chi Min trail, numbers carried the day.

OK sorry, off my soap box now, back in my hole.

L
 
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fidot

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Oh, my friend, there's such a fat joke sitting in here.. but I only could make it in Russian / for a person with a right context. :)

You see, in Russia Big Government projects are all about how to take budget (== oil primarily) money and "appropriate" it into pockets of those projects' leaders, directors, managers, lower grade managers, team leads, .... Russian economy's kickbacks rate is over 50% (meaning that everything basically costs you double and 1/2 of that money ends up directly in pockets of "agents").

It's much less subtle and much more "open" than here -- and, you don't get in trouble.

RosNano; a company that was pitched to Russian Populous as a company that was going to take Russia into the 21st century, was supposed to be focused on nano-tech, nano-bots, etc; and was mostly promoted in around 2010, when then-"president" Medvedev (we all know who was truly running the show, right? :) ), after visiting Silicon Valley decided to just "build one" in the outskirts of Moscow -- RosNano was one of the biggest companies to take place there... It's almost a running joke along Russians. "I'm having a problem with FOO (bad weather, Im sick, my cat just died, my care broke down, whatever)" - "You should get some nanobots from RosNano!" :)

So, Russians are somewhat famous for something non-beefy :)
 

Beej

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I tried this the other day; impressed. It has far better weight balance than my Smith. While Fidot calls it beefy, I would call it robust and very light.
 

Larry Lyons

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OK trying to be cool only works for so long. Fidot, a PM is on its way. I have wanted (didn't, haven't, don't need) a torch like this for years, your offer has been taken, PM on its way.

L
 

fidot

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Sold; to mr. Lyons!

Picture with dimensions posted to the top of the thread.

Now, Im not going to take this down if you guys don't mind. I have a few more coming in January. Hit me up if you want me to set one aside for you.
 

Jean-luc

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I love that tool.I think i will take one in January.Are special regulators necessary or usual as those i have with my oxy/acet bootles will be fine.I want to weld 4130N steel and aluminum
 

fidot

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I love that tool.I think i will take one in January.
Roger that, noted. Ill ping you when I get them.

Are special regulators necessary or usual as those i have with my oxy/acet bootles will be fine.I want to weld 4130N steel and aluminum
Nope, I run them off of standard US regulators. Just double check the specs for your regulators to make sure they can deliver up to the required pressure. Smiths I have run up to 100PSI.

Also, a good thing is to dip-test your connections the first time before you run the torch. Set the working pressure (you remember it's set with the gas flowing; right? :) ), close the torch valves, and submerge every hose connection you have in a glass of water. Look for bubbles. If you see some, stop and repair before continuing.

Also, Ill add a "note on setting pressures -- how I do it" to the top of the post for the reference :)
 

fidot

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Added my notes on reg's setup to the top of the thread. I use that method on any torch BTW :)
 

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