Skybolt fuselage tubing

Discussion in 'Steen Skybolt' started by 33K, May 22, 2018.

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  1. May 22, 2018 #1

    33K

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    So a couple of months ago I ordered the Skybolt fuselage tubing kit from Spruce. They've been telling me some of it was on back order every couple of weeks. Today I got a call asking how I would like it cut.

    Does anybody have preprepared list I could use?

    Paul
     
  2. May 22, 2018 #2

    IanJ

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    I'd just have it shipped in raw form (20' lengths or whatever) -- you'll need to have steel cutting capability if you're going to build the fuselage, and you're going to be far more careful with your cuts than they will. It would truly suck to get the tubes in and realize they misread your instructions or set the intern to the job, and cut some of them 1/4" too short or something. If you get the tubes pre-cut you also don't get any of the offcuts lying around, which can be useful material in and of itself.
     
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  3. May 22, 2018 #3

    lakeracer69

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    Get the longest lengths you can. ACS throws it in a box, burrs on the ends of tubes, doesn't pack it or tape the tubing together and sends it to you with little or no packing.


    If it arrives without scratches and gouges, go buy a lottery ticket. My experiences were mostly shipped from Georgia. California was a little better, but not much.


    Good Luck
     
  4. May 23, 2018 #4

    Jerry

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    Paul

    Have you looked in the Skybolt newsletters yet? I’m sure it’s listed in there somewhere.
     
  5. May 23, 2018 #5

    Jerry

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    Last edited: May 23, 2018
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  6. May 23, 2018 #6

    Beej

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  7. May 23, 2018 #7

    planebuilder

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    I agree with getting full lengths. If you can, start by making the longest tubes first, then when you screw one end up, it just becomes the next shorter tube, minimal waste that way.
     
  8. Jun 10, 2018 #8

    33K

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    Thanks everyone, After talking to them again they said they knew what to do. I eventually received two boxes. One 20 feet long, and one 24 feet long. It was shipped to my work, and I used our box truck to bring it home.

    On another note, splicing the longerons, the forward tube is 7/8 x .035 and the rear tube is 3/4 x .035. there seems to be a lot of gap between the two sizes. Is this what everyone has used?

    Paul
     
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  9. Jun 11, 2018 #9

    IanJ

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    I have the impression that the joint between those two has a long fishmouth (like 3-4x the diameter of the tube it's cut into), and may be tapered down by judicious use of a hammer, press, or similar tool, possibly involving some heat. This is based on observations I've made of completed fuselages, not any work I've done myself, so take it with a sizable lump of salt. ;)
     
  10. Jun 11, 2018 #10

    Knight Twister

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    Hundreds of Skybolts flying with that splice. I would avoid straying from a proven design.
     
  11. Jun 11, 2018 #11

    33K

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    I went with the plans. Tacking one side then working the larger tube down w heat.
     
  12. Jul 8, 2018 #12

    Mark Barrieault

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  13. Jul 10, 2018 #13

    Beagle

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    I
    have a fuselage on gear I’d be willing t sell
     
  14. Jul 10, 2018 #14

    planebuilder

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    The gap between the tubes is not significant. Nominally if the tubes are concentric the gap is .028", if all on one side it's .055", less than the diameter of a 1/16 welding rod. In the real world it doesn't matter, but if you want the tubes concentric, hammer a few inches of 1/16 rod flat, and wedge 3 short pieces of the flattened rod into the gap.
     
  15. Jul 10, 2018 #15

    33K

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    Thanks everyone, new question. I met a fella over the weekend with a Skybolt he built in the 1990's. He said if he would do it again, he'd recline the rear seat, move the top bar 3" back to increase comfort. Also he said to add 3" in length to the front cockpit to fit people easier. If I move the cross bars back like he suggested, does it matter that the tubes don't meet the clusters like in the plans??? Structural speaking.
     
  16. Jul 10, 2018 #16

    cwilliamrose

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    Yes, it matters. Does it matter enough to worry about? That I don't know, someone would have to run some numbers based on the loads the structure sees.
     
  17. Jul 10, 2018 #17

    33K

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    Another approach, what if I move the seat bottom forward? How much play room do I have with the rudder pedals? Control stick? I currently fly a Luscombe, so I'm used to not-so-confortable, seats.
     
  18. Jul 10, 2018 #18

    cwilliamrose

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    If you move the seat bottom forward the pedals will have to go forward too or you really won't gain anything from the seat back recline. I want to move the pedals forward on my S-2A but the passenger's legs will get more involved with my feet so I'm doing everything else I can first in hopes of minimizing the amount the pedals need to move.

    One thing I would not do is spend years building an uncomfortable airplane. I moved the entire seat aft 5" full inches on my S-1 project so as to be more comfortable than I am in a stock airplane.
     
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  19. Jul 11, 2018 #19

    taff

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    I am posting two photo's, the plans showing station 83 of the 1980's and station 85 for the 1994 plans. So the seat cross tube went back 2 inches over the years. (the other stuff/ text is from a previous posting)

    Another photo of my Skybolt, I took it back 2 inches. The green Skybolt I saw at Oshkosh, I have seen two other Skybolts with this tube being 2" further back. I copied the method of installation base on what I saw.
    If you add 2 (or 3 inches) to the front cockpit, you either have no room for instruments in front panel or the pilot's panel. (probably could if you went glass.)
    If you add 2 inches at the front of the passenger cockpit you probably will not have room to install the windshield.
    DSCN8127 (1280x960).jpg DSCN8126 (1280x960).jpg DSCN7012 (1024x768).jpg DSCN2319.JPG
     
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  20. Jul 11, 2018 #20

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    I'll have to get home tonight and check. But I do have the newer plans so apparently my seat should be reclined little more than the older style. It puts me at ease, I don't mind doing some things over, but would like to keep it to a min. :)
     

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